Contribution to tumor angiogenesis from innate immune cells within the tumor microenvironment: Implications for immunotherapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The critical role of angiogenesis in promoting tumor growth and metastasis is strongly established. However, tumors show considerable variation in angiogenic characteristics and in their sensitivity to antiangiogenic therapy. Tumor angiogenesis involves not only cancer cells but also various tumor-associated leukocytes (TALs) and stromal cells. TALs produce chemokines, cytokines, proteases, structural proteins, and microvescicles. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inflammatory chemokines are not only major proangiogenic factors but are also immune modulators, which increase angiogenesis and lead to immune suppression. In our review, we discuss the regulation of angiogenesis by innate immune cells in the tumor microenvironment, specific features, and roles of major players: macrophages, neutrophils, myeloid-derived suppressor and dendritic cells, mast cells, γδT cells, innate lymphoid cells, and natural killer cells. Anti-VEGF or anti-inflammatory drugs could balance an immunosuppressive microenvironment to an immune permissive one. Anti-VEGF as well as anti-inflammatory drugs could therefore represent partners for combinations with immune checkpoint inhibitors, enhancing the effects of immune therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number527
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume9
Issue numberAPR
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 5 2018

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Chemoprevention
  • Immune cells
  • Immunotherapy
  • Tumor microenvironment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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