Control of intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) by extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide

L. Gattinoni, T. Kolobow, T. Tomlinson, D. White, J. Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Five lambs were anaesthetized, paralysed, mechanically ventilated and connected to a membrane 'lung' to permit removal of carbon dioxide. When part of the carbon dioxide was removed in this manner, the tidal volume was decreased to keep PaCO 2 constant. For example, when 70% of carbon dioxide was removed by the membrane lung, total ventilation was reduced by 50%, peak inspiratory pressure was decreased by 45%, and PaO 2 was kept constant by increasing the inspired oxygen fraction from 0.21 to 0.27%. The removal of carbon dioxide by a membrane during positive pressure breathing could decrease barotrauma, particularly in poorly compliant lungs. Technically, the extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide is a relatively simple procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-758
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume50
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 1978

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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