Conventional and ambulatory blood pressure measurement in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension: Second progress report on the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring project in the Syst-Eur trial

Lutgarde Thijs, Hilde Celis, Deny Clement, Blas Gil-Extremera, Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz, Guiseppe Mancia, Gianfranco Parati, Antonio Salvetti, Cinzia Sarti, Anton H. Van Den Meiracker, Eoin O'Brien, Jan A. Staessen, Robert Fagard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To compare clinic and ambulatory blood pressure measurement and the reproducibility of these measurements in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Patients: A total of 477 patients aged ≥ 60 years with isolated systolic hypertension on clinic measurement were monitored during the placebo run-in phase of the Syst-Eur trial. Methods: The time-weighted 24 h blood pressure, clock time day and night blood pressure, the cumulative sum-derived crest and trough blood pressure and the high and low blood pressure levels of the square-wave model were computed. The daily alteration between the high and low blood pressure spans was quantified using the clock time day-night difference, the cumulative sum-derived circadian alteration magnitude, the Fourier amplitude and the difference between the high and low blood pressure levels of the square-wave model. Results: The daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure was, on average, 21 mmHg lower than the clinic blood pressure, whereas the diastolic blood pressure was, on average, similar with both techniques of measurement. In the 132 patients who underwent repeat measurements, clinic blood pressure levels and the parameters describing the difference between the daily high and low blood pressure spans were equally reproducible. However, both were less reproducible than the ambulatory blood pressure levels. The repeatability coefficients, expressed as percentages of near maximum variation, were 50 and 51% for the clinic systolic and diastolic blood pressures, 30 and 33% for the mean 24 h systolic and diastolic blood pressures and between 44 and 54% for the parameters describing the daily alteration between the high and low blood pressure spans. Conclusions: In older patients with isolated systolic hypertension, clinic and ambulatory systolic blood pressure may differ greatly; the prognostic significance of this difference remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the level of blood pressure in these patients is more reproducible by ambulatory measurement than it is by clinic measurement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-103
Number of pages9
JournalBlood Pressure Monitoring
Volume1
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Conventional sphygmomanormetry
  • Elderly
  • Isolated systolic hypertension
  • Reproducibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

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