Cooking of meat and fish in Europe - Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)

S. Rohmann, J. Linseisen, N. Becker, T. Norat, R. Sinha, G. Skeie, E. Lund, C. Martínez, A. Barricarte, I. Mattisson, G. Berglund, A. Welch, G. Davey, K. Overvad, A. Tjønneland, F. Clavel-Chapelon, E. Kesse, G. Lotze, K. Klipstein-Grobusch, E. VasilopoulouE. Polychronopoulos, V. Pala, E. Celentano, H. B. Bueno-de-Mesquita, P. H M Peeters, E. Riboli, N. Slimani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: There is epidemiologic evidence that the consumption of fried, grilled or barbecued meat and fish that are well-done or browned may be associated with an increased cancer risk. These high-temperature cooking methods are thought to be surrogates for mutagens and carcinogens produced in meat and fish, eg heterocyclic amines or polycyclic hydrocarbons. Since data on food cooking methods are scarce, the aim of this study was to describe the variation in meat and fish cooking methods in different parts of Europe. Design: Using a standardized 24 h recall from a sub-sample of the EPIC cohort (35 644 persons, 35-75 y old), mean daily intake of meat and fish prepared by different cooking methods and the relative contribution of the cooking methods to the overall cooking of meat and fish was calculated. Results: Whereas frying was more often noted in northern Europe, roasting and stir frying were more often used in the south. Concerning high-temperature cooking methods, their frequency of application varies between 15% in the EPIC cohort of North-Italy and 49% in the cohort of The Netherlands. Average consumption of fried, grilled and barbecued meat and fish ranges from a low of 12g/day in the centres in southern Spain to a high of 91 g/day in northern Spain. Conclusion: High variation in both the kind of meat/fish consumed as well as its cooking methods is observed within EPIC. In order to use this variation for the evaluation of the impact of cooking methods on cancer risk, a questionnaire on meat and fish cooking methods is being developed and could be applied in the whole EPIC cohort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1216-1230
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume56
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Cooking
Meat
cooking
Fishes
meat
nutrition
neoplasms
fish
Neoplasms
Spain
Cyclic Hydrocarbons
polycyclic hydrocarbons
stir frying
heterocyclic amines
Temperature
meat consumption
roasting
Mutagens
Northern European region
frying

Keywords

  • 24h recall
  • Cooking methods
  • EPIC
  • Fish
  • Meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Cooking of meat and fish in Europe - Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC). / Rohmann, S.; Linseisen, J.; Becker, N.; Norat, T.; Sinha, R.; Skeie, G.; Lund, E.; Martínez, C.; Barricarte, A.; Mattisson, I.; Berglund, G.; Welch, A.; Davey, G.; Overvad, K.; Tjønneland, A.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Kesse, E.; Lotze, G.; Klipstein-Grobusch, K.; Vasilopoulou, E.; Polychronopoulos, E.; Pala, V.; Celentano, E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Peeters, P. H M; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 56, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 1216-1230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohmann, S, Linseisen, J, Becker, N, Norat, T, Sinha, R, Skeie, G, Lund, E, Martínez, C, Barricarte, A, Mattisson, I, Berglund, G, Welch, A, Davey, G, Overvad, K, Tjønneland, A, Clavel-Chapelon, F, Kesse, E, Lotze, G, Klipstein-Grobusch, K, Vasilopoulou, E, Polychronopoulos, E, Pala, V, Celentano, E, Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB, Peeters, PHM, Riboli, E & Slimani, N 2002, 'Cooking of meat and fish in Europe - Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 56, no. 12, pp. 1216-1230. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601494
Rohmann, S. ; Linseisen, J. ; Becker, N. ; Norat, T. ; Sinha, R. ; Skeie, G. ; Lund, E. ; Martínez, C. ; Barricarte, A. ; Mattisson, I. ; Berglund, G. ; Welch, A. ; Davey, G. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjønneland, A. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Kesse, E. ; Lotze, G. ; Klipstein-Grobusch, K. ; Vasilopoulou, E. ; Polychronopoulos, E. ; Pala, V. ; Celentano, E. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. ; Peeters, P. H M ; Riboli, E. ; Slimani, N. / Cooking of meat and fish in Europe - Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC). In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002 ; Vol. 56, No. 12. pp. 1216-1230.
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AU - Rohmann, S.

AU - Linseisen, J.

AU - Becker, N.

AU - Norat, T.

AU - Sinha, R.

AU - Skeie, G.

AU - Lund, E.

AU - Martínez, C.

AU - Barricarte, A.

AU - Mattisson, I.

AU - Berglund, G.

AU - Welch, A.

AU - Davey, G.

AU - Overvad, K.

AU - Tjønneland, A.

AU - Clavel-Chapelon, F.

AU - Kesse, E.

AU - Lotze, G.

AU - Klipstein-Grobusch, K.

AU - Vasilopoulou, E.

AU - Polychronopoulos, E.

AU - Pala, V.

AU - Celentano, E.

AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.

AU - Peeters, P. H M

AU - Riboli, E.

AU - Slimani, N.

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Objectives: There is epidemiologic evidence that the consumption of fried, grilled or barbecued meat and fish that are well-done or browned may be associated with an increased cancer risk. These high-temperature cooking methods are thought to be surrogates for mutagens and carcinogens produced in meat and fish, eg heterocyclic amines or polycyclic hydrocarbons. Since data on food cooking methods are scarce, the aim of this study was to describe the variation in meat and fish cooking methods in different parts of Europe. Design: Using a standardized 24 h recall from a sub-sample of the EPIC cohort (35 644 persons, 35-75 y old), mean daily intake of meat and fish prepared by different cooking methods and the relative contribution of the cooking methods to the overall cooking of meat and fish was calculated. Results: Whereas frying was more often noted in northern Europe, roasting and stir frying were more often used in the south. Concerning high-temperature cooking methods, their frequency of application varies between 15% in the EPIC cohort of North-Italy and 49% in the cohort of The Netherlands. Average consumption of fried, grilled and barbecued meat and fish ranges from a low of 12g/day in the centres in southern Spain to a high of 91 g/day in northern Spain. Conclusion: High variation in both the kind of meat/fish consumed as well as its cooking methods is observed within EPIC. In order to use this variation for the evaluation of the impact of cooking methods on cancer risk, a questionnaire on meat and fish cooking methods is being developed and could be applied in the whole EPIC cohort.

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