Cooperative effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag38 gene transduction and interleukin 12 in vaccination against spontaneous tumor development in proto-neu transgenic mice

L. Sfondrini, M. Rodolfo, M. Singh, M. P. Colombo, M. I. Colnaghi, S. Ménard, A. Balsari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

An approach to stimulating an immune response against tumors is to transduce tumor cells with bacterial genes, which represent a "danger signal" and can induce a wide immune response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and their encoded proteins play a pivotal role in linking innate and cell-mediated adaptive immunity and represent ideal candidates as immune adjuvants for tumor vaccines. The efficacy of a cancer vaccine, obtained by transduction of a mammary tumor cell line with the M. tuberculosis Ag38 gene, was investigated in female mice transgenically expressing the rat HER-2/neu proto-oncogene. These mice spontaneously develop stochastic mammary tumors after a long latency period. The onset of spontaneous mammary tumors was significantly delayed in mice vaccinated with Ag38-transduced cells but not in mice vaccinated with nontransduced cells as compared with untreated mice. Protection from spontaneous tumor development was increased when mice were vaccinated with the mycobacterium gene-transduced vaccine plus a systemic administration of interleukin 12 (IL-12) at a low dose. Mice vaccinated with nontransduced cells plus IL-12 developed tumors, with only a slight delay in tumor appearance as compared with the control group. Lymphocytes obtained from lymph nodes of mice vaccinated with transduced cells secreted high levels of IFN-γ. CD3 +CD8 + spleen cells derived from these mice responded to the tumor with IFN-γ production. These data indicate the efficacy of a short-term protocol of vaccinations exploiting the adjuvant potency of a M. tuberculosis gene and low doses of IL-12 in a model of stochastic development of mammary tumors. This adjuvant approach may represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for cancer immunization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3777-3781
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research
Volume60
Issue number14
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2000

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Interleukin-12
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Transgenic Mice
Vaccination
Genes
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Cancer Vaccines
Bacterial Genes
Proto-Oncogenes
Adaptive Immunity
Mycobacterium
Tumor Cell Line
Cellular Immunity
Immunization
Vaccines
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
Lymphocytes
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cooperative effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag38 gene transduction and interleukin 12 in vaccination against spontaneous tumor development in proto-neu transgenic mice. / Sfondrini, L.; Rodolfo, M.; Singh, M.; Colombo, M. P.; Colnaghi, M. I.; Ménard, S.; Balsari, A.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 60, No. 14, 15.07.2000, p. 3777-3781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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