Coronary stenting versus balloon angioplasty in small coronary artery with complex lesions

Carlo Briguori, Takahiro Nishida, Milena Adamian, Remo Albiero, Angelo Anzuini, Carlo Di Mario, Antonio Colombo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The impact of stenting on small vessels (<3.0 mm) with complex lesions (B2-C) is still controversial. Restenosis rate in this population is high (> 40%). We compared early and late outcome of patients with complex coronary lesions in small vessel treated with traditional coronary angioplasty (angioplasty group) and with elective stent implantation (stent group). Angioplasty group (n = 97) and stent group (n = 112) were comparable for all clinical and angiographic characteristics. All patients in the two groups had clinical and angiographic follow-up. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and restenosis rate were evaluated. No patients in the two groups experienced in- hospital death or bypass surgery. Myocardial infarction occurred in four patients in the angioplasty group and in seven patients in the stent group (P = 0.36). No patients in either the angioplasty or the stent group had acute stent thrombosis, whereas subacute stent thrombosis occurred in only one patients of the stent group (0.9%). Long-term MACEs (20 ± 4 month) were not different in the two groups (angioplasty group 39% vs. stent group 44%, P = 0.35). Target lesion revascularization rate was 33% in the angioplasty group and 34% in the stent group (P = 0.50). Restenosis rate was not statistically different in the two groups (stent group 41% vs. angioplasty group 38%, P = 0.41). In conclusion, compared to balloon angioplasty, elective stent implantation in small vessels with complex lesions does not improve early and late outcome. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-397
Number of pages8
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Balloon Angioplasty
Stents
Coronary Vessels
Angioplasty
Thrombosis
Myocardial Infarction

Keywords

  • Coronary angioplasty
  • Small vessel
  • Stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Coronary stenting versus balloon angioplasty in small coronary artery with complex lesions. / Briguori, Carlo; Nishida, Takahiro; Adamian, Milena; Albiero, Remo; Anzuini, Angelo; Di Mario, Carlo; Colombo, Antonio.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 50, No. 4, 2000, p. 390-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Briguori, Carlo ; Nishida, Takahiro ; Adamian, Milena ; Albiero, Remo ; Anzuini, Angelo ; Di Mario, Carlo ; Colombo, Antonio. / Coronary stenting versus balloon angioplasty in small coronary artery with complex lesions. In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. 2000 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 390-397.
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