Correlations between cognitive impairment, middle cerebral artery flow velocity and cortical glucose metabolism in the early phase of Alzheimer’s disease

M. Franceschi, M. Alberoni, S. Bressi, N. Canal, G. Comi, F. Fazio, F. Grassi, D. Perani, M. A. Volonté

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a previous transcranial Doppler (TCD) study, we demonstrated a decrease in blood flow velocity in the proximal tract of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In these patients there was also an asymmetry in blood flow velocity which positively correlated with the cognitive asymmetry often seen in the early phase of AD. In this study we found a correlation between the absolute values and asymmetry indexes ofMCA blood flow velocity with adjusted metabolic values and asymmetry indexes of the relative cortical frontotemporoparietal (FTP) areas, evaluated by FDG-PET, and with neuropsychological asymmetry indexes. Patients with prevalent visuospatial deficits (right hemisphere dysfunction) showed significant decreases in right MCA blood flow velocity and right FTP cortical glucose hypometabolism, whereas in patients with prevalent language deficits (left hemisphere dysfunction), these signs were observed on the other side. In AD patients, the decrease of blood flow velocity in MCA might be due to reduced metabolic demands in the temporoparietal cortical areas primarily affected by AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Dementia
  • FDG-PET
  • Language
  • Middle cerebral artery
  • Transcranial Doppler
  • Visuospatial abilities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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