Cortical changes in incipient Alzheimer's disease

Annapaola Prestia, Valeria Drago, Paul E. Rasser, Matteo Bonetti, Paul M. Thompson, Giovanni B. Frisoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined by memory impairment with no impact on daily activities. 10 to 15% of MCI convert to Alzheimer's disease (AD) per year. While structural changes in the cortex of AD patients have been extensively investigated, fewer studies analyzed changes in the years preceding conversion. 46 MCI patients and 20 healthy controls underwent structural 1.0T-weighted high-resolution MR scans at baseline and after 1.4 (SD 0.3) years. All subjects were assessed yearly for up to 4 years with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Sixteen of the 46 patients converted to AD (cMCI) while 30 remained stable (sMCI). An accurate voxel-based statistical mesh-model technique (cortical pattern matching) with a related region-of-interest analysis based on networks defined from a Brodmann area atlas (BAs) were used to map gray matter changes over time. At baseline, cMCI patients had 10 to 30% less cortical gray matter volume than healthy controls in regions known to be affected by AD pathology (entorhinal, temporoparietal, posterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortex, p=0.0001). Over time, cMCI patients lost more gray matter than sMCI in all brain areas but mainly in the olfactory and in the polysynaptic hippocampal network (more than 8% gray matter loss, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1339-1349
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cortical gray matter
  • early diagnosis
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • structural MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

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