Corticosteroid treatment influences TA-Proteinuria and renal survival in IgA nephropathy

Cristina Sarcina, Carmine Tinelli, Francesca Ferrario, Bianca Visciano, Antonello Pani, Annalisa De Silvestri, Ilaria De Simone, Lucia Del Vecchio, Veronica Terraneo, Silvia Furiani, Gaia Santagostino, Enzo Corghi, Claudio Pozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The clinical course of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and its outcome are extremely variable. Proteinuria at baseline has been considered one of the most important risk factors. More recently, mean proteinuria of follow-up (time-average proteinuria: TAp) was described as a stronger marker of renal survival, suggesting to consider it as a marker of disease activity and response to treatment. We evaluated predictors of renal survival in IgAN patients with different degrees of renal dysfunction and histological lesions, focusing on the role of the therapy in influencing TAp. We performed a retrospective analysis of three prospective, randomized, clinical trials enrolling 325 IgAN patients from 1989 to 2005. Patients were divided into 5 categories according to TAp. The primary endpoint of the 100% increase of serum creatinine occurred in 54 patients (16.6%) and renal survival was much better in groups having lower TAp. The median follow up was 66.6 months (range 12 to 144). The primary endpoint of the 100% increase of serum creatinine occurred in 54 patients (16,6%) and renal survival was much better in groups having lower TA proteinuria. At univariate analysis plasma creatinine and 24h proteinuria, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure during follow-up and treatment with either steroid (CS) or steroid plus azathioprine (CS+A) were the main factors associated with lower TAp and renal survival. At multivariate analysis, female gender, treatment with S or S+A, lower baseline proteinuria and SBP during followup remained as the only variables independently influencing TAp. In conclusion, TA-proteinuria is confirmed as one of the best outcome indicators, also in patients with a severe renal insufficiency. A 6-month course of corticosteroids seems the most effective therapy to reduce TAp.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0158584
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

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adrenal cortex hormones
kidney diseases
Proteinuria
Immunoglobulin A
Creatinine
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
kidneys
Kidney
Steroids
creatinine
Blood pressure
Azathioprine
endpoints
Therapeutics
steroids
Plasmas
therapeutics
randomized clinical trials
diastolic blood pressure
proteinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Corticosteroid treatment influences TA-Proteinuria and renal survival in IgA nephropathy. / Sarcina, Cristina; Tinelli, Carmine; Ferrario, Francesca; Visciano, Bianca; Pani, Antonello; De Silvestri, Annalisa; De Simone, Ilaria; Vecchio, Lucia Del; Terraneo, Veronica; Furiani, Silvia; Santagostino, Gaia; Corghi, Enzo; Pozzi, Claudio.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0158584, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sarcina, C, Tinelli, C, Ferrario, F, Visciano, B, Pani, A, De Silvestri, A, De Simone, I, Vecchio, LD, Terraneo, V, Furiani, S, Santagostino, G, Corghi, E & Pozzi, C 2016, 'Corticosteroid treatment influences TA-Proteinuria and renal survival in IgA nephropathy', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 7, e0158584. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0158584
Sarcina, Cristina ; Tinelli, Carmine ; Ferrario, Francesca ; Visciano, Bianca ; Pani, Antonello ; De Silvestri, Annalisa ; De Simone, Ilaria ; Vecchio, Lucia Del ; Terraneo, Veronica ; Furiani, Silvia ; Santagostino, Gaia ; Corghi, Enzo ; Pozzi, Claudio. / Corticosteroid treatment influences TA-Proteinuria and renal survival in IgA nephropathy. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 7.
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