Counting back from a visually presented digit increases recall asymmetries between hemispheres

A Brown-Peterson experiment with lateral projection of trigrams

C. Parravicini, H. Spinnler, R. Sterzi, G. Vallar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of a verbal distracting activity on memory performance of the left and right hemisphere was investigated in normal subjects by showing the time course of laterally presented consonant trigrams in the Brown-Peterson paradigm. Experiment 1 showed that delay alone, with no interpolated activity, did not produce significant hemispheric asymmetries. In Experiment 2 a verbal interfering task produced a significant greater memory impairment for LVF/RH inputs. In order to test some hypotheses fitting the data of these 2 experiments, 2 parameters were altered. Increasing the exposure time (Experiment 3) and reducing the amount of information to be recalled (Experiment 4) reduced the RVF/LH advantage. As in Experiments 3 and 4 the verbal features of both the laterality and the interpolated task were not modified, this result lends support to a dual code model rather than to a selective activation model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-289
Number of pages11
JournalCortex
Volume17
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Counting back from a visually presented digit increases recall asymmetries between hemispheres : A Brown-Peterson experiment with lateral projection of trigrams. / Parravicini, C.; Spinnler, H.; Sterzi, R.; Vallar, G.

In: Cortex, Vol. 17, No. 2, 1981, p. 279-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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