Course of migraine during pregnancy and postpartum: A prospective study

Grazia Sances, F. Granella, R. E. Nappi, A. Fignon, N. Ghiotto, F. Polatti, G. Nappi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the course of migraine during pregnancy and postpartum. Of all the pregnant women consecutively attending an obstetrics and gynaecology department for a routine first-trimester antenatal check-up, 49 migraine sufferers - two were affected by migraine with aura (MA) and 47 by migraine without aura (MO) - who had experienced at least one attack during the 3 months preceding pregnancy were identified, enrolled in the study and given a headache diary. Subsequent examinations were performed at the end of the second and third trimesters and 1 month after delivery. Migraine was seen to improve in 46.8% of the 47 MO sufferers during the first trimester, in 83.0% during the second and in 87.2% during the third, while complete remission was attained by 10.6%, 53.2%, and 78.7% of the women, respectively. Migraine recurred during the first week after childbirth in 34.0% of the women and during the first month in 55.3%. Certain risk factors for lack of improvement of migraine during pregnancy were identified: the presence of menstrually related migraine before pregnancy was associated with a lack of headache improvement in the first and third trimesters, while second-trimester hyperemesis, and a pathological pregnancy course were associated with a lack of headache improvement in the second trimester. Breast feeding seemed to protect from migraine recurrence during postpartum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-205
Number of pages9
JournalCephalalgia
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2003

Keywords

  • Breast feeding
  • Migraine without aura
  • Postpartum
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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