CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

Annabella Pignataro, Antonella Borreca, Martine Ammassari-Teule, Silvia Middei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice). We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra) in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi), the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number651469
JournalNeural Plasticity
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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