Cryptogenic partial epilepsy in the adult and in the child: Comparative sleep activation profile of interictal abnormalities

P. Genton, R. Guerrini, M. Bureau, J. Roger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 2 groups of 15 patients (adults and children respectively) presenting with cryptogenic partial epilepsy (normal neurological status, normal CT scan), we polygraphically recorded a full sleep cycle during the afternoon nap. In the adult group (10 F, 5 M, mean age 27 yrs, range 17-42), epilepsy had begun after the age of 15 and had been followed over 3y7m (range: 6m - 17 yrs); in the pediatric group (7 F, 8 M, mean age 8y9m, range 5 - 12), epilepsy had begun after the age of 3 and had been followed over 2y3m (range 3 m - 6 yrs). Interictal epileptiform abnormalities were quantified per minute of tracing for each individual sleep stage (waking, drowsiness, stage 2, stage 3-4, REM, awakening); the appearance of new foci was also noted with respect to sleep stage. In both age groups, we noted a significant activation of interictal paroxysms vs the waking state during all stages of slow sleep (drowsiness thru stage 3-4), but no significant activation in REM sleep. Interictal abnormalities were more frequent in the children, during the waking state as well as in each sleep stage, but interindividual variations were important. In the adult group, 8 patients, including 6 who failed to show focal abnormalities on their waking EEG, showed new/supplementary foci during slow sleep. Spontaneous afternoon sleep proves to be an efficient and practical method of activation in cryptogenic partial epilepsies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBollettino - Lega Italiana contro l'Epilessia
Pages253-255
Number of pages3
Edition64
Publication statusPublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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