CT scan studies of aphasia.

S. F. Cappa, L. A. Vignolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CT scan studies of lesion localization in aphasic patients have in general confirmed the traditional locus of damage within the left hemisphere for the major syndromes. Some interesting exceptions have come to light, such as the possible occurrence of global aphasia with a partial lesion (anterior or posterior) of the language zone. The study of correlations in vivo has underlined the importance of considering time since onset in the evaluation of the clinical picture. Description of atypical aphasias associated with subcortical lesions and correlation of lesion site with specific, partial aspects of linguistic impairment are two areas where CT scan studies are increasing our understanding of the language machinery in the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-134
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Neurobiology
Volume2
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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Aphasia
Language
Linguistics
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Cappa, S. F., & Vignolo, L. A. (1983). CT scan studies of aphasia. Human Neurobiology, 2(3), 129-134.

CT scan studies of aphasia. / Cappa, S. F.; Vignolo, L. A.

In: Human Neurobiology, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1983, p. 129-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cappa, SF & Vignolo, LA 1983, 'CT scan studies of aphasia.', Human Neurobiology, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 129-134.
Cappa SF, Vignolo LA. CT scan studies of aphasia. Human Neurobiology. 1983;2(3):129-134.
Cappa, S. F. ; Vignolo, L. A. / CT scan studies of aphasia. In: Human Neurobiology. 1983 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 129-134.
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