Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker

Eugenio Mattei, Federica Censi, Matteo Mancini, Antonio Napolitano, Elisabetta Genovese, Vittorio Cannata, Giancarlo Burriesci, Rosaria Falsaperla, Giovanni Calcagnini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The static magnetic field generated by MRI systems is highly non-homogenous and rapidly decreases when moving away from the bore of the scanner. Consequently, the movement around the MRI scanner is equivalent to an exposure to a time-varying magnetic field at very low frequency (few Hz). If people with an implanted pacemaker (PM) enter the MRI room, fast movements may thus induce voltages on the loop formed by the PM lead, with the potential to modify the correct behavior of the stimulator. In this study, we performed in-vitro measurements on a human-shaped phantom, equipped with an implantable PM and with a current sensor, able to monitor the activity of the PM while moving the phantom in the MRI room. Fast rotational movements in close proximity of the bore of the scanner caused the inappropriate inhibition of the PM, programmed in VVI modality, maximum sensitivity, unipolar sensing and pacing. The inhibition occurred for a variation of the magnetic field of about 3 T/s. These findings demonstrate that great care must be paid when extending PM MRI compatibility from patients to healthcare personnel, since the safety procedures and the MRI-conditional PM programming (e.g. asynchronous stimulation or bipolar sensing) used for patients cannot be applied.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages890-893
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424479290
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2 2014
Event2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Aug 26 2014Aug 30 2014

Other

Other2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period8/26/148/30/14

Fingerprint

Pacemakers
Induced currents
Magnetic Fields
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic fields
Delivery of Health Care
Safety
Inhibition (Psychology)
Lead
Personnel
Sensors
Electric potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Mattei, E., Censi, F., Mancini, M., Napolitano, A., Genovese, E., Cannata, V., ... Calcagnini, G. (2014). Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker. In 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014 (pp. 890-893). [6943734] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6943734

Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker. / Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Mancini, Matteo; Napolitano, Antonio; Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio; Burriesci, Giancarlo; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Calcagnini, Giovanni.

2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. p. 890-893 6943734.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mattei, E, Censi, F, Mancini, M, Napolitano, A, Genovese, E, Cannata, V, Burriesci, G, Falsaperla, R & Calcagnini, G 2014, Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker. in 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014., 6943734, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 890-893, 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014, Chicago, United States, 8/26/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6943734
Mattei E, Censi F, Mancini M, Napolitano A, Genovese E, Cannata V et al. Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker. In 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2014. p. 890-893. 6943734 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6943734
Mattei, Eugenio ; Censi, Federica ; Mancini, Matteo ; Napolitano, Antonio ; Genovese, Elisabetta ; Cannata, Vittorio ; Burriesci, Giancarlo ; Falsaperla, Rosaria ; Calcagnini, Giovanni. / Currents induced by fast movements inside the MRI room may cause inhibition in an implanted pacemaker. 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. pp. 890-893
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