Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a high risk of developing primary headache: A longitudinal study

Romina Moavero, Laura Papetti, Maria Chiara Bernucci, Caterina Cenci, Michela Ada Noris Ferilli, Giorgia Sforza, Federico Vigevano, Massimiliano Valeriani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine are a group of disorders affecting patients with migraine or with an increased risk of presenting it, and likely represent an early life expression of migraine. Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are well characterized and represent a frequent cause of request for specialist consultations. The aim of this study is to longitudinally assess the rate of headache in patients presenting with cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis during infancy, and to define the main clinical features of the disorder.

METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to the parents of all our pediatric patients with previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and/or benign paroxysmal torticollis according to ICHD-3; questions were focused on the main clinical features of the disorder as well as the prognosis, with particular emphasis on the development of headache.

RESULTS: For the final analysis we considered 82 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome and 33 with benign paroxysmal torticollis. Seventy-nine percent of patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome presented with headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 6 years; 67% of patients with benign paroxysmal torticollis suffered from headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 5 years.

DISCUSSION: Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a very high risk of developing headache, mostly migraine, later in life. In both groups of patients, the vast majority presented with different episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine at different ages, thus suggesting an age-dependent evolution of migraine-like symptoms before the onset of clear migrainous headache.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333102419844542
JournalCephalalgia
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Apr 13 2019

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Torticollis
Headache
Longitudinal Studies
Migraine Disorders
Age of Onset
Familial cyclic vomiting syndrome
Referral and Consultation
Parents
Pediatrics

Cite this

@article{01faf07adbc747c09da6622249503aa4,
title = "Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a high risk of developing primary headache: A longitudinal study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND AIM: Episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine are a group of disorders affecting patients with migraine or with an increased risk of presenting it, and likely represent an early life expression of migraine. Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are well characterized and represent a frequent cause of request for specialist consultations. The aim of this study is to longitudinally assess the rate of headache in patients presenting with cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis during infancy, and to define the main clinical features of the disorder.METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to the parents of all our pediatric patients with previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and/or benign paroxysmal torticollis according to ICHD-3; questions were focused on the main clinical features of the disorder as well as the prognosis, with particular emphasis on the development of headache.RESULTS: For the final analysis we considered 82 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome and 33 with benign paroxysmal torticollis. Seventy-nine percent of patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome presented with headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 6 years; 67{\%} of patients with benign paroxysmal torticollis suffered from headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 5 years.DISCUSSION: Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a very high risk of developing headache, mostly migraine, later in life. In both groups of patients, the vast majority presented with different episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine at different ages, thus suggesting an age-dependent evolution of migraine-like symptoms before the onset of clear migrainous headache.",
author = "Romina Moavero and Laura Papetti and Bernucci, {Maria Chiara} and Caterina Cenci and Ferilli, {Michela Ada Noris} and Giorgia Sforza and Federico Vigevano and Massimiliano Valeriani",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1177/0333102419844542",
language = "English",
pages = "333102419844542",
journal = "Cephalalgia",
issn = "0333-1024",
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}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a high risk of developing primary headache

T2 - A longitudinal study

AU - Moavero, Romina

AU - Papetti, Laura

AU - Bernucci, Maria Chiara

AU - Cenci, Caterina

AU - Ferilli, Michela Ada Noris

AU - Sforza, Giorgia

AU - Vigevano, Federico

AU - Valeriani, Massimiliano

PY - 2019/4/13

Y1 - 2019/4/13

N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine are a group of disorders affecting patients with migraine or with an increased risk of presenting it, and likely represent an early life expression of migraine. Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are well characterized and represent a frequent cause of request for specialist consultations. The aim of this study is to longitudinally assess the rate of headache in patients presenting with cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis during infancy, and to define the main clinical features of the disorder.METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to the parents of all our pediatric patients with previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and/or benign paroxysmal torticollis according to ICHD-3; questions were focused on the main clinical features of the disorder as well as the prognosis, with particular emphasis on the development of headache.RESULTS: For the final analysis we considered 82 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome and 33 with benign paroxysmal torticollis. Seventy-nine percent of patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome presented with headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 6 years; 67% of patients with benign paroxysmal torticollis suffered from headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 5 years.DISCUSSION: Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a very high risk of developing headache, mostly migraine, later in life. In both groups of patients, the vast majority presented with different episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine at different ages, thus suggesting an age-dependent evolution of migraine-like symptoms before the onset of clear migrainous headache.

AB - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine are a group of disorders affecting patients with migraine or with an increased risk of presenting it, and likely represent an early life expression of migraine. Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are well characterized and represent a frequent cause of request for specialist consultations. The aim of this study is to longitudinally assess the rate of headache in patients presenting with cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis during infancy, and to define the main clinical features of the disorder.METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to the parents of all our pediatric patients with previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and/or benign paroxysmal torticollis according to ICHD-3; questions were focused on the main clinical features of the disorder as well as the prognosis, with particular emphasis on the development of headache.RESULTS: For the final analysis we considered 82 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome and 33 with benign paroxysmal torticollis. Seventy-nine percent of patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome presented with headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 6 years; 67% of patients with benign paroxysmal torticollis suffered from headache during the follow-up, with a mean age at onset of 5 years.DISCUSSION: Cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal torticollis are associated with a very high risk of developing headache, mostly migraine, later in life. In both groups of patients, the vast majority presented with different episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine at different ages, thus suggesting an age-dependent evolution of migraine-like symptoms before the onset of clear migrainous headache.

U2 - 10.1177/0333102419844542

DO - 10.1177/0333102419844542

M3 - Article

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SP - 333102419844542

JO - Cephalalgia

JF - Cephalalgia

SN - 0333-1024

ER -