Cytokine regulation of monocyte recruitment

A. Mantovani, B. Bottazzi, S. Sozzani, G. Peri, P. Allavena, Q. G. Dong, A. Vecchi, F. Colotta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Phagocytes infiltrating neoplastic tissues have peculiar membrane phenotype and functional properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play a complex, ambiguous role in the regulation of primary tumor growth and metastasis (a 'macrophage balance'). Yet these cells are strategically located at the very interface between tumor and host and represent a potential target for immunomodulation. A better understanding of the regulation and function of TAM may provide a less empirical basis of or rational design of therapeutic approaches, as vividly illustrated by the antitumor activity of i.p. in IFN ovarian cancer patients with minimal residual disease resistant to chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-152
Number of pages4
JournalArchivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis
Volume43
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Monocytes
Cytokines
Macrophages
Neoplasms
Immunomodulation
Residual Neoplasm
Phagocytes
Ovarian Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Phenotype
Drug Therapy
Membranes
Growth
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cytokine
  • ovarian cancer
  • tumor-associated macrophages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Cytokine regulation of monocyte recruitment. / Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Sozzani, S.; Peri, G.; Allavena, P.; Dong, Q. G.; Vecchi, A.; Colotta, F.

In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, Vol. 43, No. 2, 1995, p. 149-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Vecchi, A.

AU - Colotta, F.

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