Cytoplasmic accumulation of p53 protein: An independent prognostic indicator in colorectal adenocarcinomas

Silvano Bosari, Giuseppe Viale, Paola Bossi, Marco Maggioni, Guido Coggi, John J. Murray, Arthur K C Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Aberrations of the p53 gene (also known as TP53) frequently lead to the synthesis of mutant proteins that accumulate in the nuclei and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Intracellular p53 protein accumulation may be an unfavorable prognostic parameter in breast, lung, ovarian, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Specific classes of p53 gene mutations, assayed by characteristic subcellular p53 protein accumulation patterns, may be useful prognostic indicators. Purpose: The prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in the tumor cells of patients with colorectal carcinoma was studied. Methods: Antibodies PAb 1801 and CM1 were used for immunocytochemical assay of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in a retrospective series of colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from 206 patients who were followed for at least 5 years. Results were correlated with the following clinicopathologic parameters: patient sex and age; tumor site, stage, and grade; and DNA ploidy status of the tumors. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed with the Kaplan- Meier method. Differences in distributions were analyzed using the Mantel- Cox method. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Immunostaining with PAb 1801 revealed nuclear p53 accumulation in 46% (95) of 206 cases, whereas CM1 immunostaining of 197 cases showed nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in 33% (65 cases) and 50% (99 cases) of the cases, respectively. In univariate analysis, both nuclear p53(PAb 1801) and cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulations were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = .0198 and P = .0017, respectively) and with disease-free survival (P = .004 and P = .0016, respectively). When patients were analyzed according to site of their tumors, nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation was statistically significant only in the right colon (P = .027), whereas cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was statistically significant in the left colon and rectum (P = .0016). In multivariate analysis, only cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was associated with poor overall survival and with disease-free survival (P = .006 and P = .002, respectively). With the addition of DNA ploidy status, however, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation remained significant only for disease-free survival (P = .035). In patients with tumors of the left colon and rectum, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was the most significant prognostic indicator for overall survival (P = .007) and disease-free survival (P = .002) after disease stage. Conclusion: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation, but not nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation, is an independent prognostic parameter in patients with colorectal carcinomas. Implications: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) accumulation may be a useful indicator of patients at high risk for disease recurrence who may benefit from aggressive adjuvant therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)681-687
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume86
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - May 4 1994

Fingerprint

Adenocarcinoma
Proteins
Protein
Disease-Free Survival
Tumors
Colorectal Neoplasms
Tumor
Colon
Survival
Ploidies
p53 Genes
Neoplasms
Rectum
Multivariate Analysis
DNA
Genes
Gene
Kaplan-Meier
Mutant Proteins
Ovarian Cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Cytoplasmic accumulation of p53 protein : An independent prognostic indicator in colorectal adenocarcinomas. / Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Bossi, Paola; Maggioni, Marco; Coggi, Guido; Murray, John J.; Lee, Arthur K C.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 86, No. 9, 04.05.1994, p. 681-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7333c1a54a1d46a09fa3745af15896e6,
title = "Cytoplasmic accumulation of p53 protein: An independent prognostic indicator in colorectal adenocarcinomas",
abstract = "Background: Aberrations of the p53 gene (also known as TP53) frequently lead to the synthesis of mutant proteins that accumulate in the nuclei and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Intracellular p53 protein accumulation may be an unfavorable prognostic parameter in breast, lung, ovarian, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Specific classes of p53 gene mutations, assayed by characteristic subcellular p53 protein accumulation patterns, may be useful prognostic indicators. Purpose: The prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in the tumor cells of patients with colorectal carcinoma was studied. Methods: Antibodies PAb 1801 and CM1 were used for immunocytochemical assay of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in a retrospective series of colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from 206 patients who were followed for at least 5 years. Results were correlated with the following clinicopathologic parameters: patient sex and age; tumor site, stage, and grade; and DNA ploidy status of the tumors. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed with the Kaplan- Meier method. Differences in distributions were analyzed using the Mantel- Cox method. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Immunostaining with PAb 1801 revealed nuclear p53 accumulation in 46{\%} (95) of 206 cases, whereas CM1 immunostaining of 197 cases showed nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in 33{\%} (65 cases) and 50{\%} (99 cases) of the cases, respectively. In univariate analysis, both nuclear p53(PAb 1801) and cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulations were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = .0198 and P = .0017, respectively) and with disease-free survival (P = .004 and P = .0016, respectively). When patients were analyzed according to site of their tumors, nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation was statistically significant only in the right colon (P = .027), whereas cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was statistically significant in the left colon and rectum (P = .0016). In multivariate analysis, only cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was associated with poor overall survival and with disease-free survival (P = .006 and P = .002, respectively). With the addition of DNA ploidy status, however, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation remained significant only for disease-free survival (P = .035). In patients with tumors of the left colon and rectum, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was the most significant prognostic indicator for overall survival (P = .007) and disease-free survival (P = .002) after disease stage. Conclusion: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation, but not nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation, is an independent prognostic parameter in patients with colorectal carcinomas. Implications: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) accumulation may be a useful indicator of patients at high risk for disease recurrence who may benefit from aggressive adjuvant therapy.",
author = "Silvano Bosari and Giuseppe Viale and Paola Bossi and Marco Maggioni and Guido Coggi and Murray, {John J.} and Lee, {Arthur K C}",
year = "1994",
month = "5",
day = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "681--687",
journal = "Journal of the National Cancer Institute",
issn = "0027-8874",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cytoplasmic accumulation of p53 protein

T2 - An independent prognostic indicator in colorectal adenocarcinomas

AU - Bosari, Silvano

AU - Viale, Giuseppe

AU - Bossi, Paola

AU - Maggioni, Marco

AU - Coggi, Guido

AU - Murray, John J.

AU - Lee, Arthur K C

PY - 1994/5/4

Y1 - 1994/5/4

N2 - Background: Aberrations of the p53 gene (also known as TP53) frequently lead to the synthesis of mutant proteins that accumulate in the nuclei and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Intracellular p53 protein accumulation may be an unfavorable prognostic parameter in breast, lung, ovarian, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Specific classes of p53 gene mutations, assayed by characteristic subcellular p53 protein accumulation patterns, may be useful prognostic indicators. Purpose: The prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in the tumor cells of patients with colorectal carcinoma was studied. Methods: Antibodies PAb 1801 and CM1 were used for immunocytochemical assay of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in a retrospective series of colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from 206 patients who were followed for at least 5 years. Results were correlated with the following clinicopathologic parameters: patient sex and age; tumor site, stage, and grade; and DNA ploidy status of the tumors. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed with the Kaplan- Meier method. Differences in distributions were analyzed using the Mantel- Cox method. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Immunostaining with PAb 1801 revealed nuclear p53 accumulation in 46% (95) of 206 cases, whereas CM1 immunostaining of 197 cases showed nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in 33% (65 cases) and 50% (99 cases) of the cases, respectively. In univariate analysis, both nuclear p53(PAb 1801) and cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulations were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = .0198 and P = .0017, respectively) and with disease-free survival (P = .004 and P = .0016, respectively). When patients were analyzed according to site of their tumors, nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation was statistically significant only in the right colon (P = .027), whereas cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was statistically significant in the left colon and rectum (P = .0016). In multivariate analysis, only cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was associated with poor overall survival and with disease-free survival (P = .006 and P = .002, respectively). With the addition of DNA ploidy status, however, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation remained significant only for disease-free survival (P = .035). In patients with tumors of the left colon and rectum, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was the most significant prognostic indicator for overall survival (P = .007) and disease-free survival (P = .002) after disease stage. Conclusion: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation, but not nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation, is an independent prognostic parameter in patients with colorectal carcinomas. Implications: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) accumulation may be a useful indicator of patients at high risk for disease recurrence who may benefit from aggressive adjuvant therapy.

AB - Background: Aberrations of the p53 gene (also known as TP53) frequently lead to the synthesis of mutant proteins that accumulate in the nuclei and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Intracellular p53 protein accumulation may be an unfavorable prognostic parameter in breast, lung, ovarian, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Specific classes of p53 gene mutations, assayed by characteristic subcellular p53 protein accumulation patterns, may be useful prognostic indicators. Purpose: The prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in the tumor cells of patients with colorectal carcinoma was studied. Methods: Antibodies PAb 1801 and CM1 were used for immunocytochemical assay of nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein accumulation in a retrospective series of colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from 206 patients who were followed for at least 5 years. Results were correlated with the following clinicopathologic parameters: patient sex and age; tumor site, stage, and grade; and DNA ploidy status of the tumors. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed with the Kaplan- Meier method. Differences in distributions were analyzed using the Mantel- Cox method. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Immunostaining with PAb 1801 revealed nuclear p53 accumulation in 46% (95) of 206 cases, whereas CM1 immunostaining of 197 cases showed nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in 33% (65 cases) and 50% (99 cases) of the cases, respectively. In univariate analysis, both nuclear p53(PAb 1801) and cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulations were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = .0198 and P = .0017, respectively) and with disease-free survival (P = .004 and P = .0016, respectively). When patients were analyzed according to site of their tumors, nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation was statistically significant only in the right colon (P = .027), whereas cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was statistically significant in the left colon and rectum (P = .0016). In multivariate analysis, only cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was associated with poor overall survival and with disease-free survival (P = .006 and P = .002, respectively). With the addition of DNA ploidy status, however, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation remained significant only for disease-free survival (P = .035). In patients with tumors of the left colon and rectum, cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation was the most significant prognostic indicator for overall survival (P = .007) and disease-free survival (P = .002) after disease stage. Conclusion: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) protein accumulation, but not nuclear p53(PAb 1801) protein accumulation, is an independent prognostic parameter in patients with colorectal carcinomas. Implications: Cytoplasmic p53(CM1) accumulation may be a useful indicator of patients at high risk for disease recurrence who may benefit from aggressive adjuvant therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028286988&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028286988&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8158699

AN - SCOPUS:0028286988

VL - 86

SP - 681

EP - 687

JO - Journal of the National Cancer Institute

JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute

SN - 0027-8874

IS - 9

ER -