Decompressive percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in advanced cancer patients with small-bowel obstruction is feasible and effective: a large prospective study

Elena Zucchi, Mara Fornasarig, Luca Martella, Stefania Maiero, Emilio Lucia, Eugenio Borsatti, Luca Balestreri, Giorgio Giorda, Maria Antonietta Annunziata, Renato Cannizzaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-centered outcomes of decompressive percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (dPEG) in patients with malignant bowel obstruction due to advanced gynecological and gastroenteric malignancies. Methods: This is a prospective analysis of 158 consecutive patients with small-bowel obstruction from advanced gynecological and gastroenteric cancer who underwent PEG or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ) positioning for decompressive purposes from 2002 to 2012. All of them had previous abdominal surgery and were unfit for any other surgical procedures. Symptom relief, procedural complications, and post dPEG palliation were assessed. Global Quality of Life (QoL) was evaluated in the last 2 years (25 consecutive patients) before and 7 days after dPEG placement using the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS). Results: dPEG was successfully performed in 142 out of 158 patients (89.8 %). Failure of tube placement occurred in 16 patients (10.1 %). In 8/142 (5.6 %) patients, dPEG was guided by abdominal ultrasound. In 3/142 patients, dPEG was CT-guided. In 14 (9.8 %) patients, who had previously undergone total or subtotal gastrectomy, decompressive percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (dPEJ) was performed. In 1/14 patients, dPEJ was CT-guided. Out of 142 patients, 110 (77.4 %) experienced relief from nausea and vomiting 2 days after PEG. Out of 142 patients, 116 (81.6 %) were discharged. The median postoperative hospital stay was 9 days (range 3–60). Peristomal infection (14 %) and intermittent obstruction (8.4 %) were the most frequent complications associated with PEG. Median survival time was 57 days (range 4–472) after PEG placement. Twenty-five patients had QoL properly evaluated with SDS score before and 7 days after dPEG. Sixteen patients (64 %) out of 25 exhibited an improvement of QoL (p <0.05), 7 (28 %) patients exhibited a non-significant worsening of QoL (p = 0.18), and in 2 (8 %) patients, it remained unmodified. Conclusions: dPEG is feasible, effective, relieves nausea and vomiting in patients with unremitting small-bowel obstruction from advanced gynecological and gastroenteric cancer, and improves QoL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2877-2882
Number of pages6
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Gastrointestinal occlusion
  • Gastrostomy
  • Jejunostomy
  • Palliative treatment
  • Peritoneal carcinomatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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