Deep sedation with propofol for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in children, administered by specially trained pediatricians: A prospective case series with emphasis on side effects

E. Barbi, P. Petaros, L. Badina, T. Pahor, I. Giuseppin, E. Biasotto, S. Martelossi, G. Di Leo, A. Sarti, A. Ventura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Study Aims: The need to administer procedural sedation to children has increased in recent years, as has experience in this field among nonanesthesiologists. Using propofol makes it easier to achieve sufficiently deep sedation. There is a considerable literature on the administration of propofol by nonanesthesiologists for gastroscopy in adults, but very few data are available on this issue in children. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of procedural sedation with propofol for gastroscopy in a pediatric ward with trained personnel and monitoring facilities. Patients and Methods: A training protocol was developed to educate nurses and residents. Children requiring gastroscopy were included in the study prospectively and underwent procedural sedation with propofol administered by nonanesthesiologists. Results: A total of 811 upper gas trointestinal endoscopies were carried out with procedural sedation. Sedation was achieved in all procedures, and all but three (0.4 %) were conducted successfully. None of the patients required intubation. Stridor with signs of upper airway obstruction occurred in 14 of the 811 procedures (1.7%). Laryngoscopy was required to manage difficulties in introducing the gastroscope in 16 of the 811 procedures (2.0%). Major desaturation requiring a short course of ventilation occurred in six procedures (0.7%), and transient desaturation that resolved spontaneously occurred in 97 of the procedures (12 %). Conclusions: Administration of propofol by nonanesthesiologists for gastroscopy examinations in children was successful in this study, but was associated with a small risk of potentially severe complications. Although the residents were generally able to administer procedural sedation alone, constant and immediate availability of anesthesiological support continues to be mandatory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)368-375
Number of pages8
JournalEndoscopy
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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