Defective FOXP3 expression in patients with acute Kawasaki disease and restoration by intravenous immunoglobulin therapy

Biagio Olivito, Andrea Taddio, Gabriele Simonini, Cristina Massai, Sara Ciullini, Eleonora Gambineri, Maurizio De Martino, Chiara Azzari, Rolando Cimaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The aims of this study were: 1) to investigate forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in patients with Kawasaki disease (KD), exploring possible differences during the acute phase and after defervescence; 2) to evaluate a possible association of the FOXP3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 543 (SNP ID: rs2232367) with KD. Methods. FOXP3 expression was evaluated on 8 children with KD and 15 healthy children by flow cytometry and Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). FOXP3 SNP 543 was genotyped by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing on DNA samples from 58 additional children with KD and 114 healthy donors. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25 +FOXP3+ regulatory T cells were significantly (p=0.0002) lower during the acute phase of KD than in sex-and age-matched healthy donors (median % ± SD: 4.8±1.3 vs. 7.7±1.7) and a similar tendency was revealed for FOXP3 mRNA transcripts (pT; for a total of 1 allele out of 88), with no difference between KD patients and controls (0.0%, 0/203 alleles). Conclusion. Our data reinforce the notion of an impaired immunoregulation in KD, suggesting also a role of IVIG treatment in modifying the Treg com-partment. FOXP3 SNP 543 does not seem to be involved in susceptibility to KD in Italian children.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and Experimental Rheumatology
Volume28
Issue number1 SUPPL. 57
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Forkhead box p3
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin
  • Kawasaki disease
  • Regulatory T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

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