Defining serum ferritin thresholds to predict clinically relevant liver iron concentrations for guiding deferasirox therapy when MRI is unavailable in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia

Ali T. Taher, John B. Porter, Vip Viprakasit, Antonis Kattamis, Suporn Chuncharunee, Pranee Sutcharitchan, Noppadol Siritanaratkul, Raffaella Origa, Zeynep Karakas, Dany Habr, Zewen Zhu, Maria Domenica Cappellini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Summary: Liver iron concentration (LIC) assessment by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the gold standard to diagnose iron overload and guide iron chelation therapy in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT). However, limited access to MRI technology and expertise worldwide makes it practical to also use serum ferritin assessments. The THALASSA (assessment of Exjade® in non-transfusion-dependent THALASSemiA patients) study assessed the efficacy and safety of deferasirox in iron-overloaded NTDT patients and provided a large data set to allow exploration of the relationship between LIC and serum ferritin. Using data from screened patients and those treated with deferasirox for up to 2 years, we identified clinically relevant serum ferritin thresholds (for when MRI is unavailable) for the initiation of chelation therapy (>800 μg/l), as well as thresholds to guide chelator dose interruption (2000 μg/l). (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00873041).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-290
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume168
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • Chelation therapy
  • Iron overload
  • Liver iron concentration
  • Non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia
  • Serum ferritin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Medicine(all)

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