Dehydroepiandrosterone prevents oxidative injury induced by transient ischemia/reperfusion in the brain of diabetic rats

Manuela Aragno, Silvia Parola, Enrico Brignardello, Alessandro Mauro, Elena Tamagno, Roberta Manti, Oliviero Danni, Giuseppe Boccuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Both chronic hyperglycemia and ischemia/reperfusion (IR) cause an imbalance in the oxidative state of tissues. Normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. Rats had either been treated with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for 7, 14, or 21 days (2 or 4 mg/day per rat) or left untreated. Oxidative state, antioxidant balance, and membrane integrity were evaluated in isolated synaptosomes. IR increased the levels of reactive species and worsened the synaptic function, affecting membrane Na/K-ATPase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release in all rats. The oxidative imbalance was much severer when transient IR was induced in STZ-diabetic rats. DHEA treatment restored H2O2, hydroxyl radical, and reactive oxygen species to close to control levels in normoglycemic rats and significantly reduced the level of all reactive species in STZ-diabetic rats. Moreover, DHEA treatment counteracted the detrimental effect of IR on membrane integrity and function: the increase of lactate dehydrogenase release and the drop in Na/K-ATPase activity were significantly prevented in both normoglycemic and STZ-diabetic rats. The results confirm that DHEA, an adrenal steroid that is synthesized de novo by brain neurons and astrocytes, possesses a multitargeted antioxidant effect. They also show that DHEA treatment is effective in preventing both derangement of the oxidative state and neuronal damage induced by IR in experimental diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1924-1931
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes
Volume49
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Dehydroepiandrosterone
Reperfusion
Ischemia
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Streptozocin
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Membranes
Antioxidants
Synaptosomes
Carotid Arteries
Astrocytes
Hyperglycemia
Hydroxyl Radical
Reactive Oxygen Species
Steroids
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Aragno, M., Parola, S., Brignardello, E., Mauro, A., Tamagno, E., Manti, R., ... Boccuzzi, G. (2000). Dehydroepiandrosterone prevents oxidative injury induced by transient ischemia/reperfusion in the brain of diabetic rats. Diabetes, 49(11), 1924-1931.

Dehydroepiandrosterone prevents oxidative injury induced by transient ischemia/reperfusion in the brain of diabetic rats. / Aragno, Manuela; Parola, Silvia; Brignardello, Enrico; Mauro, Alessandro; Tamagno, Elena; Manti, Roberta; Danni, Oliviero; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 49, No. 11, 2000, p. 1924-1931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aragno, M, Parola, S, Brignardello, E, Mauro, A, Tamagno, E, Manti, R, Danni, O & Boccuzzi, G 2000, 'Dehydroepiandrosterone prevents oxidative injury induced by transient ischemia/reperfusion in the brain of diabetic rats', Diabetes, vol. 49, no. 11, pp. 1924-1931.
Aragno, Manuela ; Parola, Silvia ; Brignardello, Enrico ; Mauro, Alessandro ; Tamagno, Elena ; Manti, Roberta ; Danni, Oliviero ; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe. / Dehydroepiandrosterone prevents oxidative injury induced by transient ischemia/reperfusion in the brain of diabetic rats. In: Diabetes. 2000 ; Vol. 49, No. 11. pp. 1924-1931.
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