Delayed exposure to wheat and barley proteins reduces diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic mice

Sandra Schmid, Kerstin Koczwara, Susanne Schwinghammer, Vito Lampasona, Anette G. Ziegler, Ezio Bonifacio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary gluten, vitamin D3, and fish-oil are suggested to influence the incidence of autoimmune diabetes. To determine whether modification of their intake could reduce diabetes incidence and autoimmunity in mice, pups from female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were fed diets modified for protein source, fatty acid content, and/or vitamin D3 content and were followed for diabetes development, insulin autoantibodies (IAA), and insulitis. Replacement of wheat and barley with poultry as the major protein source significantly affected diabetes development. Diabetes onset was delayed and diabetes incidence was significantly reduced in female mice that received the wheat and barley protein-free diet throughout life (45% by age 32 weeks vs. 88% in control mice; P <0.01), from weaning (42%; P <0.005), or from 3 to 10 weeks of age only (36%; P <0.01), and diabetes development was not completely restored by gliadin supplementation of the wheat and barley protein-free diet (58%; P <0.05). Insulin autoantibodies (P <0.01) and insulitis scores (P <0.02) were reduced, and intra-pancreatic IL-4 mRNA increased (P <0.05) in wheat and barley protein-deprived mice. Diabetes incidence was neither reduced by fish-oil or vitamin D3 supplementation alone, nor in mice fed a wheat and barley protein-free diet that was supplemented with fish-oil and vitamin D3. These data support a link between dietary wheat and barley proteins and the development of autoimmune diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-118
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Inbred NOD Mouse
Hordeum
Triticum
Cholecalciferol
Protein-Restricted Diet
Fish Oils
Incidence
Proteins
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Autoantibodies
Insulin
Gliadin
Glutens
Poultry
Weaning
Autoimmunity
Interleukin-4
Fatty Acids
Diet
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Diabetes
  • Diet
  • Fish-oil
  • Gluten
  • NOD mice
  • Prevention
  • Vitamin D3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Delayed exposure to wheat and barley proteins reduces diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic mice. / Schmid, Sandra; Koczwara, Kerstin; Schwinghammer, Susanne; Lampasona, Vito; Ziegler, Anette G.; Bonifacio, Ezio.

In: Clinical Immunology, Vol. 111, No. 1, 04.2004, p. 108-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmid, Sandra ; Koczwara, Kerstin ; Schwinghammer, Susanne ; Lampasona, Vito ; Ziegler, Anette G. ; Bonifacio, Ezio. / Delayed exposure to wheat and barley proteins reduces diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic mice. In: Clinical Immunology. 2004 ; Vol. 111, No. 1. pp. 108-118.
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