Dendritic cells and macrophages: Same receptors but different functions

Ivan Zanoni, Francesca Granucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages differently contribute to the generation of coordinated immune system responses against infectious agents. They interact with microbes through germline-encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize molecular patterns expressed by various microorganisms. Upon antigen binding, PRRs instruct DCs for the appropriate priming of natural killer cells, followed by specific T-cell responses. Once completed the effector phase, DCs reach the terminal differentiation stage and eventually die by apoptosis. By contrast, following antigen recognition, macrophages initiate first the inflammatory process and then switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype for the restoration of tissue homeostasis. In this review we will focus on the comparison of the divergent responses of DCs and macrophages to microbial stimuli and in particular to lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-325
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Immunology Reviews
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Dendritic Cells
Macrophages
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Antigens
Natural Killer Cells
Lipopolysaccharides
Immune System
Homeostasis
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Apoptosis
T-Lymphocytes
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Dendritic cells
  • Inflammation
  • Lipopolysaccharade
  • Macrophages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Dendritic cells and macrophages : Same receptors but different functions. / Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca.

In: Current Immunology Reviews, Vol. 5, No. 4, 11.2009, p. 311-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zanoni, Ivan ; Granucci, Francesca. / Dendritic cells and macrophages : Same receptors but different functions. In: Current Immunology Reviews. 2009 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 311-325.
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