Depleted mitochondrial DNA content in peripheral blood of women with a history of HELLP syndrome

Debora Lattuada, Francesca Crovetto, Laura Trespidi, Sveva Mangano, Barbara Acaia, Edgardo Somigliana, Luigi Fedele, Giorgio Bolis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that a quantitative defect of maternal cellular mitochondria would play a role in the pathogenesis of HELLP syndrome. Study design: Peripheral blood mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) was measured in 20 non-pregnant women with a history of HELLP syndrome, 40 non-pregnant control subjects who had previous physiologic pregnancies, 59 subjects carrying physiologic pregnancies, seven pregnant women with a history of HELLP syndrome and five women in the active phase of the disease. Main outcome measure: Peripheral blood Mt-DNA. Results: The median (interquartile range) mtDNA in women with a history of HELLP syndrome, in non-pregnant women who had previous physiologic pregnancies, in subjects carrying physiologic pregnancies, in pregnant women with a history of HELLP syndrome and in women in the active phase of the disease was 115 (81-194), 229 (199-319), 174 (136-211), 101 (82-178) and 92 (39-129) copies per nuclear DNA, respectively. Non-pregnant women with a history of HELLP syndrome had significantly lower levels than non-pregnant controls (p <0.001). Moreover, blood mtDNA was lower in pregnant women with a history of HELLP syndrome and in those in the active phase of the disease when compared to pregnant controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Conclusions: Attenuated maternal mitochondrial function may favor HELLP syndrome development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-160
Number of pages6
JournalPregnancy Hypertension
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • HELLP syndrome
  • Mitochondria
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Internal Medicine

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