Depressive symptoms and maternal psychological distress during early infancy

A pilot study in preterm as compared with term mother-infant dyads

C Pisoni, S Spairani, F Manzoni, G Ariaudo, C Naboni, M Moncecchi, U Balottin, C Tinelli, B Gardella, C Tzialla, M Stronati, L Bollani, S Orcesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Preterm birth does not only affect infants but also represents an unexpected and traumatic event for parents. There are few reports on parenting stress during early infancy comparing preterm and term mothers, with the results being somewhat inconsistent.

METHODS: As part of a longitudinal study, preterm mother-infant and term mother-infant dyads were enrolled. Dyads were assessed twice: during hospitalisation in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at 3 months of infant age (corrected age for preterm). Each mother completed a self-report set of psychological questionnaire in both time points. All the children underwent a neurological examination at 40 weeks post conceptional age and at 3 months (corrected age for preterm).

RESULTS: 20 preterm and 20 term dyads were included. NICU mothers reported elevated postnatal depressive symptoms and high stress level, even if the preterm infants were with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination. Comparing preterm infant with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination with term-born children at 3 months, we found higher parental stress in term mothers than in preterm mothers.

LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by a relatively small sample size; findings are preliminary and warrant further investigation in larger-scale study.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirm that becoming a mother of a preterm infant is an event associated with emotional distress. These symptoms may resolve with time, and sometimes are independent of the infant's clinical severity. Assessing parental sources of stress and subsequent follow-up is essential to promote parental support, both for preterm and term mothers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)470-476
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume257
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 5 2019

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Mothers
Depression
Psychology
Premature Infants
Neurologic Examination
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Birth
Parenting
Sample Size
Self Report
Longitudinal Studies
Hospitalization
Parents

Cite this

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title = "Depressive symptoms and maternal psychological distress during early infancy: A pilot study in preterm as compared with term mother-infant dyads",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Preterm birth does not only affect infants but also represents an unexpected and traumatic event for parents. There are few reports on parenting stress during early infancy comparing preterm and term mothers, with the results being somewhat inconsistent.METHODS: As part of a longitudinal study, preterm mother-infant and term mother-infant dyads were enrolled. Dyads were assessed twice: during hospitalisation in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at 3 months of infant age (corrected age for preterm). Each mother completed a self-report set of psychological questionnaire in both time points. All the children underwent a neurological examination at 40 weeks post conceptional age and at 3 months (corrected age for preterm).RESULTS: 20 preterm and 20 term dyads were included. NICU mothers reported elevated postnatal depressive symptoms and high stress level, even if the preterm infants were with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination. Comparing preterm infant with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination with term-born children at 3 months, we found higher parental stress in term mothers than in preterm mothers.LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by a relatively small sample size; findings are preliminary and warrant further investigation in larger-scale study.CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirm that becoming a mother of a preterm infant is an event associated with emotional distress. These symptoms may resolve with time, and sometimes are independent of the infant's clinical severity. Assessing parental sources of stress and subsequent follow-up is essential to promote parental support, both for preterm and term mothers.",
author = "C Pisoni and S Spairani and F Manzoni and G Ariaudo and C Naboni and M Moncecchi and U Balottin and C Tinelli and B Gardella and C Tzialla and M Stronati and L Bollani and S Orcesi",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.039",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Depressive symptoms and maternal psychological distress during early infancy

T2 - A pilot study in preterm as compared with term mother-infant dyads

AU - Pisoni, C

AU - Spairani, S

AU - Manzoni, F

AU - Ariaudo, G

AU - Naboni, C

AU - Moncecchi, M

AU - Balottin, U

AU - Tinelli, C

AU - Gardella, B

AU - Tzialla, C

AU - Stronati, M

AU - Bollani, L

AU - Orcesi, S

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/7/5

Y1 - 2019/7/5

N2 - BACKGROUND: Preterm birth does not only affect infants but also represents an unexpected and traumatic event for parents. There are few reports on parenting stress during early infancy comparing preterm and term mothers, with the results being somewhat inconsistent.METHODS: As part of a longitudinal study, preterm mother-infant and term mother-infant dyads were enrolled. Dyads were assessed twice: during hospitalisation in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at 3 months of infant age (corrected age for preterm). Each mother completed a self-report set of psychological questionnaire in both time points. All the children underwent a neurological examination at 40 weeks post conceptional age and at 3 months (corrected age for preterm).RESULTS: 20 preterm and 20 term dyads were included. NICU mothers reported elevated postnatal depressive symptoms and high stress level, even if the preterm infants were with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination. Comparing preterm infant with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination with term-born children at 3 months, we found higher parental stress in term mothers than in preterm mothers.LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by a relatively small sample size; findings are preliminary and warrant further investigation in larger-scale study.CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirm that becoming a mother of a preterm infant is an event associated with emotional distress. These symptoms may resolve with time, and sometimes are independent of the infant's clinical severity. Assessing parental sources of stress and subsequent follow-up is essential to promote parental support, both for preterm and term mothers.

AB - BACKGROUND: Preterm birth does not only affect infants but also represents an unexpected and traumatic event for parents. There are few reports on parenting stress during early infancy comparing preterm and term mothers, with the results being somewhat inconsistent.METHODS: As part of a longitudinal study, preterm mother-infant and term mother-infant dyads were enrolled. Dyads were assessed twice: during hospitalisation in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at 3 months of infant age (corrected age for preterm). Each mother completed a self-report set of psychological questionnaire in both time points. All the children underwent a neurological examination at 40 weeks post conceptional age and at 3 months (corrected age for preterm).RESULTS: 20 preterm and 20 term dyads were included. NICU mothers reported elevated postnatal depressive symptoms and high stress level, even if the preterm infants were with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination. Comparing preterm infant with low perinatal risk and normal neurological examination with term-born children at 3 months, we found higher parental stress in term mothers than in preterm mothers.LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by a relatively small sample size; findings are preliminary and warrant further investigation in larger-scale study.CONCLUSIONS: Findings confirm that becoming a mother of a preterm infant is an event associated with emotional distress. These symptoms may resolve with time, and sometimes are independent of the infant's clinical severity. Assessing parental sources of stress and subsequent follow-up is essential to promote parental support, both for preterm and term mothers.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.039

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.039

M3 - Article

VL - 257

SP - 470

EP - 476

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -