Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients: An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory

Claudio Solaro, Erika Trabucco, A. Signori, Vittorio Martinelli, M. Radaelli, Diego Centonze, Silvia Rossi, Maria Grazia Grasso, Alessandro Clemenzi, Simona Bonavita, A. D'Ambrosio, Francesco Patti, Emanuele D'Amico, G. Cruccu, A. Truini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Depression occurs in about 50% of patients with multiple sclerosis. The aims of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a multicenterMS population using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and to identify possible correlations between the BDI II score and demographic and clinical variables. Methods: Data were collected in a multi-center, cross-sectional study over a period of six months in six MS centers in Italy using BDI II. Results: 1,011 MS patients participated in the study. 676 subjects were female, with a mean age of 34 years (SD 10.8), mean EDSS of 3.3 (0-8.5) and mean disease duration of 10.3 years (range 1-50 years). 668 (%) subjects scored lower than 14 on the BDI II and 343 (33.9%) scored greater than 14 (14 cut-off score). For patients with BDI>14 multivariate analysis showed a significant difference between EDSS and disease course. BDI II scores for subjects with secondary progressive (SP) MS were significantly different from primary progressive (PP) patients (p < 0.001) but similar to relapsing-remitting (RR) patients. Considering subjects with moderate to severe depressive symptoms (BDI II score from 20-63), in relation to disease course, 11.7% (83/710) had RR MS, 40.7% (96/236) SP and 13.6% (6/44) PP. Conclusions: Using the BDI II, 30% of the current sample had depressive symptoms. BDI II score correlates with disability and disease course, particularly in subjects with SP MS. The BDI II scale can be a useful tool in clinical practice to screen depressive symptoms in people with MS.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0160261
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

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sclerosis
disease course
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Multiple Sclerosis
Depression
Equipment and Supplies
cross-sectional studies
multivariate analysis
demographic statistics
Italy
duration
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients : An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory. / Solaro, Claudio; Trabucco, Erika; Signori, A.; Martinelli, Vittorio; Radaelli, M.; Centonze, Diego; Rossi, Silvia; Grasso, Maria Grazia; Clemenzi, Alessandro; Bonavita, Simona; D'Ambrosio, A.; Patti, Francesco; D'Amico, Emanuele; Cruccu, G.; Truini, A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 9, e0160261, 01.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solaro, C, Trabucco, E, Signori, A, Martinelli, V, Radaelli, M, Centonze, D, Rossi, S, Grasso, MG, Clemenzi, A, Bonavita, S, D'Ambrosio, A, Patti, F, D'Amico, E, Cruccu, G & Truini, A 2016, 'Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients: An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 9, e0160261. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0160261
Solaro, Claudio ; Trabucco, Erika ; Signori, A. ; Martinelli, Vittorio ; Radaelli, M. ; Centonze, Diego ; Rossi, Silvia ; Grasso, Maria Grazia ; Clemenzi, Alessandro ; Bonavita, Simona ; D'Ambrosio, A. ; Patti, Francesco ; D'Amico, Emanuele ; Cruccu, G. ; Truini, A. / Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients : An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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title = "Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients: An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory",
abstract = "Background: Depression occurs in about 50{\%} of patients with multiple sclerosis. The aims of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a multicenterMS population using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and to identify possible correlations between the BDI II score and demographic and clinical variables. Methods: Data were collected in a multi-center, cross-sectional study over a period of six months in six MS centers in Italy using BDI II. Results: 1,011 MS patients participated in the study. 676 subjects were female, with a mean age of 34 years (SD 10.8), mean EDSS of 3.3 (0-8.5) and mean disease duration of 10.3 years (range 1-50 years). 668 ({\%}) subjects scored lower than 14 on the BDI II and 343 (33.9{\%}) scored greater than 14 (14 cut-off score). For patients with BDI>14 multivariate analysis showed a significant difference between EDSS and disease course. BDI II scores for subjects with secondary progressive (SP) MS were significantly different from primary progressive (PP) patients (p < 0.001) but similar to relapsing-remitting (RR) patients. Considering subjects with moderate to severe depressive symptoms (BDI II score from 20-63), in relation to disease course, 11.7{\%} (83/710) had RR MS, 40.7{\%} (96/236) SP and 13.6{\%} (6/44) PP. Conclusions: Using the BDI II, 30{\%} of the current sample had depressive symptoms. BDI II score correlates with disability and disease course, particularly in subjects with SP MS. The BDI II scale can be a useful tool in clinical practice to screen depressive symptoms in people with MS.",
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T1 - Depressive symptoms correlate with disability and disease course in multiple sclerosis patients

T2 - An Italian multi-center study using the Beck Depression Inventory

AU - Solaro, Claudio

AU - Trabucco, Erika

AU - Signori, A.

AU - Martinelli, Vittorio

AU - Radaelli, M.

AU - Centonze, Diego

AU - Rossi, Silvia

AU - Grasso, Maria Grazia

AU - Clemenzi, Alessandro

AU - Bonavita, Simona

AU - D'Ambrosio, A.

AU - Patti, Francesco

AU - D'Amico, Emanuele

AU - Cruccu, G.

AU - Truini, A.

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Background: Depression occurs in about 50% of patients with multiple sclerosis. The aims of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a multicenterMS population using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and to identify possible correlations between the BDI II score and demographic and clinical variables. Methods: Data were collected in a multi-center, cross-sectional study over a period of six months in six MS centers in Italy using BDI II. Results: 1,011 MS patients participated in the study. 676 subjects were female, with a mean age of 34 years (SD 10.8), mean EDSS of 3.3 (0-8.5) and mean disease duration of 10.3 years (range 1-50 years). 668 (%) subjects scored lower than 14 on the BDI II and 343 (33.9%) scored greater than 14 (14 cut-off score). For patients with BDI>14 multivariate analysis showed a significant difference between EDSS and disease course. BDI II scores for subjects with secondary progressive (SP) MS were significantly different from primary progressive (PP) patients (p < 0.001) but similar to relapsing-remitting (RR) patients. Considering subjects with moderate to severe depressive symptoms (BDI II score from 20-63), in relation to disease course, 11.7% (83/710) had RR MS, 40.7% (96/236) SP and 13.6% (6/44) PP. Conclusions: Using the BDI II, 30% of the current sample had depressive symptoms. BDI II score correlates with disability and disease course, particularly in subjects with SP MS. The BDI II scale can be a useful tool in clinical practice to screen depressive symptoms in people with MS.

AB - Background: Depression occurs in about 50% of patients with multiple sclerosis. The aims of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a multicenterMS population using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and to identify possible correlations between the BDI II score and demographic and clinical variables. Methods: Data were collected in a multi-center, cross-sectional study over a period of six months in six MS centers in Italy using BDI II. Results: 1,011 MS patients participated in the study. 676 subjects were female, with a mean age of 34 years (SD 10.8), mean EDSS of 3.3 (0-8.5) and mean disease duration of 10.3 years (range 1-50 years). 668 (%) subjects scored lower than 14 on the BDI II and 343 (33.9%) scored greater than 14 (14 cut-off score). For patients with BDI>14 multivariate analysis showed a significant difference between EDSS and disease course. BDI II scores for subjects with secondary progressive (SP) MS were significantly different from primary progressive (PP) patients (p < 0.001) but similar to relapsing-remitting (RR) patients. Considering subjects with moderate to severe depressive symptoms (BDI II score from 20-63), in relation to disease course, 11.7% (83/710) had RR MS, 40.7% (96/236) SP and 13.6% (6/44) PP. Conclusions: Using the BDI II, 30% of the current sample had depressive symptoms. BDI II score correlates with disability and disease course, particularly in subjects with SP MS. The BDI II scale can be a useful tool in clinical practice to screen depressive symptoms in people with MS.

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