Detection of cytomegalovirus in saliva from infants undergoing sepsis evaluation in the neonatal intensive care unit: The VIRIoN-C study

Andrea Ronchi, Christopher P. Ouellette, Asuncion Mejías, Douglas Salamon, Amy Leber, Lorenza Pugni, Fabio Mosca, Pablo J. Sánchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine the frequency of detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) among infants evaluated for late-onset sepsis in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This study was a prospective cohort study. During the 13-month study, 84 infants underwent 116 sepsis evaluations, and CMV DNA was detected in saliva in three (4%) infants (median: gestational age 28 weeks, birth weight 950 g), representing 5% (n=6) of all sepsis evaluations. One infant had CMV DNA detected in saliva in all four sepsis evaluations. Two infants had acquired CMV infection, while the timing of CMV acquisition could not be determined in one infant. Two of the three infants had concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia and urinary tract infections (UTIs), two developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and none died. Detection of CMV DNA in saliva occurred in 4% of infants and 5% of sepsis evaluations. Persistence of CMV DNA shedding in saliva made attribution of clinical illness difficult to ascertain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-98
JournalJournal of Perinatal Medicine
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Acquired cytomegalovirus infection
  • cytomegalovirus infection
  • neonatal sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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