Determinants of the components of arterial pressure among older adults - The role of anthropometric and clinical factors: A multi-continent study

Stefanos Tyrovolas, Ai Koyanagi, Noe Garin, Beatriz Olaya, Jose Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Marta Miret, Somnath Chatterji, Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Seppo Koskinen, Matilde Leonardi, Josep Maria Haro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with different components of arterial blood pressure in nine nationally-representative samples of people aged ≥50 years. Methods: Data were available for 53,289 people aged ≥18 years who participated in the SAGE (WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health) study conducted in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa, and the COURAGE (Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe) study conducted in Finland, Poland, and Spain, between 2007 and 2012. Standard procedures were used to obtain diastolic and systolic blood pressure (DBP, SBP) measurements to identify hypertensive participants, and to determine mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP). Results: The analytical sample consisted of 42,116 people aged 50 years or older. South Africa had the highest prevalence of hypertension (78.3%), and the highest measurements of MAP±SD (113.6±36.4mmHg), SBP±SD (146.4±49.5mmHg), and DBP±SD (97.2±33.9mmHg). In the adjusted models, dose-dependent positive associations between Body Mass Index (BMI) and MAP or PP were observed in most countries ( p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-249
Number of pages10
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume238
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Hypertension
  • Mean arterial pressure
  • Obesity
  • Pulse pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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