Developing an Evidence-Based Tool for Planning and Evaluating Vaccination Strategies Aimed at Improving Coverage in Elderly and At-Risk Adult Population

BRAVE Project Expert panel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Vaccination coverages need to be constantly maintained and improved with the implementation of vaccination strategies. This paper describes the development of an evidence-based tool to guide their planning and evaluation. Methods: A scoping review was performed in MEDLINE and institutional websites to search for similar available tools. A first version of the tool was developed considering review results and a four-step method used for the control and continuous improvement of processes and products, namely the Deming cycle. A panel of eight experts was then involved in a Delphi study for the finalization of the tool that was eventually discussed in a face-to-face meeting. Results: The scoping review found only one document and the first version of the tool was composed of 30 items. After the Delphi first round, 11 additional items were suggested and 5 original items amended. After the Delphi second round 41 items were eventually included. During the face-to-face meeting, 7 items were recognized as requisites for setting vaccination strategies, whereas 17 as relevant ones. Conclusions: Current public health challenges impose the need for evidence-based tools to organize effective vaccination strategies. Our tool is a first proposal which aims to reflect this focus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)658979
Number of pages1
JournalFrontiers in Public Health
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • evaluation
  • planning
  • tool
  • vaccination
  • vaccination coverage
  • vaccination strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Developing an Evidence-Based Tool for Planning and Evaluating Vaccination Strategies Aimed at Improving Coverage in Elderly and At-Risk Adult Population'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this