Developmental disorders with intellectual disability driven by chromatin dysregulation: Clinical overlaps and molecular mechanisms

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Advances in genomic analyses based on next-generation sequencing and integrated omics approaches, have accelerated in an unprecedented way the discovery of causative genes of developmental delay (DD) and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Chromatin dysregulation has been recognized as common pathomechanism of mendelian DD/ID syndromes due to mutation in genes encoding chromatin regulators referred as transcriptomopathies or epigenetic disorders. Common to these syndromes are the wide phenotypic breadth and the recognition of groups of distinct syndromes with shared signs besides cognitive impairment, likely mirroring common molecular mechanisms. Disruption of chromatin-associated transcription machinery accounts for the phenotypic overlap of Cornelia de Lange with KBG and with syndromes of the epigenetic machinery. The genes responsible for Smith-Magenis-related disorders act in interconnected networks and the molecular signature of histone acetylation disorders joins Rubinstein-Taybi-related syndromes. Deciphering pathway interconnection of clinically similar ID syndromes may enhance search of common targets useful for developing new therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-240
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Intellectual Disability
Chromatin
Epigenomics
Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome
Developmental Disabilities
Genetic Association Studies
Acetylation
Histones
Genes
Mutation
Therapeutics

Cite this

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title = "Developmental disorders with intellectual disability driven by chromatin dysregulation: Clinical overlaps and molecular mechanisms",
abstract = "Advances in genomic analyses based on next-generation sequencing and integrated omics approaches, have accelerated in an unprecedented way the discovery of causative genes of developmental delay (DD) and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Chromatin dysregulation has been recognized as common pathomechanism of mendelian DD/ID syndromes due to mutation in genes encoding chromatin regulators referred as transcriptomopathies or epigenetic disorders. Common to these syndromes are the wide phenotypic breadth and the recognition of groups of distinct syndromes with shared signs besides cognitive impairment, likely mirroring common molecular mechanisms. Disruption of chromatin-associated transcription machinery accounts for the phenotypic overlap of Cornelia de Lange with KBG and with syndromes of the epigenetic machinery. The genes responsible for Smith-Magenis-related disorders act in interconnected networks and the molecular signature of histone acetylation disorders joins Rubinstein-Taybi-related syndromes. Deciphering pathway interconnection of clinically similar ID syndromes may enhance search of common targets useful for developing new therapeutics.",
author = "L Larizza and P Finelli",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Developmental disorders with intellectual disability driven by chromatin dysregulation

T2 - Clinical overlaps and molecular mechanisms

AU - Larizza, L

AU - Finelli, P

N1 - © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Advances in genomic analyses based on next-generation sequencing and integrated omics approaches, have accelerated in an unprecedented way the discovery of causative genes of developmental delay (DD) and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Chromatin dysregulation has been recognized as common pathomechanism of mendelian DD/ID syndromes due to mutation in genes encoding chromatin regulators referred as transcriptomopathies or epigenetic disorders. Common to these syndromes are the wide phenotypic breadth and the recognition of groups of distinct syndromes with shared signs besides cognitive impairment, likely mirroring common molecular mechanisms. Disruption of chromatin-associated transcription machinery accounts for the phenotypic overlap of Cornelia de Lange with KBG and with syndromes of the epigenetic machinery. The genes responsible for Smith-Magenis-related disorders act in interconnected networks and the molecular signature of histone acetylation disorders joins Rubinstein-Taybi-related syndromes. Deciphering pathway interconnection of clinically similar ID syndromes may enhance search of common targets useful for developing new therapeutics.

AB - Advances in genomic analyses based on next-generation sequencing and integrated omics approaches, have accelerated in an unprecedented way the discovery of causative genes of developmental delay (DD) and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Chromatin dysregulation has been recognized as common pathomechanism of mendelian DD/ID syndromes due to mutation in genes encoding chromatin regulators referred as transcriptomopathies or epigenetic disorders. Common to these syndromes are the wide phenotypic breadth and the recognition of groups of distinct syndromes with shared signs besides cognitive impairment, likely mirroring common molecular mechanisms. Disruption of chromatin-associated transcription machinery accounts for the phenotypic overlap of Cornelia de Lange with KBG and with syndromes of the epigenetic machinery. The genes responsible for Smith-Magenis-related disorders act in interconnected networks and the molecular signature of histone acetylation disorders joins Rubinstein-Taybi-related syndromes. Deciphering pathway interconnection of clinically similar ID syndromes may enhance search of common targets useful for developing new therapeutics.

U2 - 10.1111/cge.13365

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M3 - Review article

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