Developmental dyslexia and explicit long-term memory.

Deny Menghini, Giovanni Augusto Carlesimo, Luigi Marotta, Alessandra Finzi, Stefano Vicari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The reduced verbal long-term memory capacities often reported in dyslexics are generally interpreted as a consequence of their deficit in phonological coding.The present study was aimed at evaluating whether the learning deficit exhibited by dyslexics was restricted only to the verbal component of the long-term memory abilities or also involved visual-object and visual-spatial domain. A further goal of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of non-verbal long-term memory abilities with respect to word and non-word reading in dyslexic children.In accordance with these aims, performances of 60 dyslexic children were compared with that of 65 age-matched normal readers on verbal, visual-spatial and visual-object task.Results documented a generalized impairment of episodic long-term memory capacities in dyslexic children and the results did not vary as a function of children's age.Furthermore, in addition to verbal measures, also individual differences in non-verbal long-term memory tasks turn out to be good predictors of reading difficulties in dyslexics.Our findings indicate that the long-term memory deficit in dyslexia is not limited to the dysfunction of phonological components but also involves visual-object and visual-spatial aspect, thus suggesting that dyslexia is associated to multiple cognitive deficits. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-225
Number of pages13
JournalDyslexia
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Developmental dyslexia and explicit long-term memory.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this