Diabetes dietary management alters responses to food pictures in brain regions associated with motivation and emotion: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

M. Chechlacz, P. Rotshtein, S. Klamer, K. Porubská, S. Higgs, D. Booth, A. Fritsche, H. Preissl, H. Abele, N. Birbaumer, A. Nouwen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: We hypothesised that living with type 2 diabetes would enhance responses to pictures of foods in brain regions known to be involved in learnt food sensory motivation and that these stronger activations would relate to scores for dietary adherence in diabetes and to measures of potential difficulties in adherence. Methods: We compared brain responses to food images of 11 people with type 2 diabetes and 12 healthy control participants, matched for age and weight, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results: Having type 2 diabetes increased responses to pictured foods in the insula, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and basal ganglia and, within these regions, the effect of the fat content of the foods was larger in participants with type 2 diabetes than in healthy controls. Furthermore, increased activation to food within the insula and OFC positively correlated with external eating, dietary self-efficacy and dietary self-care. In contrast, responses within subcortical structures (amygdala and basal ganglia) were positively correlated with emotional eating and rated appetite for the food stimuli and negatively correlated with dietary self-care. Conclusions/interpretation: Type 2 diabetes is associated with changes in brain responses to food that are modulated by dietary self-care. We propose that this is linked to the need to follow a life-long restrictive diet.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-533
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetologia
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Motivation
Emotions
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Food
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Brain
Self Care
Basal Ganglia
Prefrontal Cortex
Eating
Appetite
Self Efficacy
Amygdala
Healthy Volunteers
Fats
Diet
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Basal ganglia
  • Dietary restraint
  • Dietary self-care
  • FMRI
  • Food pictures
  • Insula
  • Orbitofrontal cortex
  • Self-efficacy
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Diabetes dietary management alters responses to food pictures in brain regions associated with motivation and emotion : A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. / Chechlacz, M.; Rotshtein, P.; Klamer, S.; Porubská, K.; Higgs, S.; Booth, D.; Fritsche, A.; Preissl, H.; Abele, H.; Birbaumer, N.; Nouwen, A.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 52, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 524-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chechlacz, M, Rotshtein, P, Klamer, S, Porubská, K, Higgs, S, Booth, D, Fritsche, A, Preissl, H, Abele, H, Birbaumer, N & Nouwen, A 2009, 'Diabetes dietary management alters responses to food pictures in brain regions associated with motivation and emotion: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study', Diabetologia, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 524-533. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-008-1253-z
Chechlacz, M. ; Rotshtein, P. ; Klamer, S. ; Porubská, K. ; Higgs, S. ; Booth, D. ; Fritsche, A. ; Preissl, H. ; Abele, H. ; Birbaumer, N. ; Nouwen, A. / Diabetes dietary management alters responses to food pictures in brain regions associated with motivation and emotion : A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. In: Diabetologia. 2009 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 524-533.
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