Diagnostic accuracy of S100B urinary testing at birth in full-term asphyxiated newborns to predict neonatal death

Diego Gazzolo, Alessandro Frigiola, Moataza Bashir, Iman Iskander, Hala Mufeed, Hanna Aboulgar, Pierluigi Venturini, Mauro Marras, Giovanni Serra, Rosanna Frulio, Fabrizio Michetti, Felice Petraglia, Raul Abella, Pasquale Florio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Neonatal death in full-term infants who suffer from perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a major subject of investigation, since few tools exist to predict patients at risk of ominous outcome. We studied the possibility that urine S100B measurement may identify which PA-affected infants are at risk of early postnatal death. Methodology/Principal Findings: In a cross-sectional study between January 1, 2001 and December 1, 2006 we measured S100B protein in urine collected from term infants (n = 132), 60 of whom suffered PA. According to their outcome at 7 days, infants with PA were subsequently classified either as asphyxiated infants complicated by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with no ominous outcome (HIE Group; n = 48), or as newborns who died within the first post-natal week (Ominous Outcome Group; n = 12). Routine laboratory variables, cerebral ultrasound, neurological patterns and urine concentrations of S100B protein were determined at first urination and after 24, 48 and 96 hours. The severity of illness in the first 24 hours after birth was measured using the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-Perinatal Extension (SNAP-PE). Urine S100B levels were higher from the first urination in the ominous outcome group than in healthy or HIE Groups (p1.0 μg/L S100B had a sensitivity/ specificity of 100% for predicting neonatal death. Conclusions/Significance: Increased S100B protein urine levels in term newborns suffering PA seem to suggest a higher risk of neonatal death for these infants.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere4298
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Diagnostic accuracy of S100B urinary testing at birth in full-term asphyxiated newborns to predict neonatal death'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this