Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease

Cristina Meazza, Mauro Bozzola

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In recent years, pediatricians have frequently encountered the problem of short stature or stunted growth rate in the context of celiac disease (CD). In fact, the prevalence of CD in patients evaluated for short stature varies between 2% and 10%. The first step in the evaluation of short stature is the exclusion of CD; as many other chronic conditions may be responsible for growth failure, this is followed by an endocrinological investigation and an evaluation of GH secretion. In fact, false GH responses to pharmacological tests have been observed, followed by their normalization after initiation of a gluten-free diet (GFD). Furthermore, after the start of a GFD, catch-up growth is generally observed, and the celiac child usually returns to his/her normal growth curve for weight and height within 1-2 years. The evaluation of GH secretion should be performed in CD children who show no catch-up growth after at least one year of a strict GFD, and after seronegativity for anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies have been confirmed. In subjects with CD and growth hormone deficiency (GHD), substitutive therapy with GH should be administered at standard doses and should be promptly started, in order to obtain complete catch-up growth. The long-term effects of GH therapy in children who follow a strict GFD are similar to those observed in children with idiopathic GHD. Finally, the existence of a close relationship between CD and autoimmune diseases, such as thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus type I, is suggested by the fact that CD is an autoimmune disorder. The pathogenetic mechanism is still not completely known and, only partly, linked to the increase in intestinal permeability.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCeliac Disease: An Update
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages49-76
Number of pages28
ISBN (Print)9781631174773, 9781631170881
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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diagnostic
Disease
evaluation
permeability
normalization
chronic illness
exclusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Meazza, C., & Bozzola, M. (2014). Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease. In Celiac Disease: An Update (pp. 49-76). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease. / Meazza, Cristina; Bozzola, Mauro.

Celiac Disease: An Update. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. p. 49-76.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Meazza, C & Bozzola, M 2014, Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease. in Celiac Disease: An Update. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 49-76.
Meazza C, Bozzola M. Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease. In Celiac Disease: An Update. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2014. p. 49-76
Meazza, Cristina ; Bozzola, Mauro. / Diagnostic approach to short stature in children with celiac disease. Celiac Disease: An Update. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. pp. 49-76
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