Diastolic dysfunction diagnosed by tissue Doppler imaging in cirrhotic patients: Prevalence and its possible relationship with clinical outcome

Calogero Falletta, Daniela Filì, Cinzia Nugara, Gabriele Di Gesaro, Chiara Minà, Cesar Mario Hernandez Baravoglia, Giuseppe Romano, Cesare Scardulla, Fabio Tuzzolino, Giovanni Vizzini, Francesco Clemenza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy has been characterized by impaired contractile response to stress and/or altered diastolic relaxation, with electrophysiological abnormalities in the absence of known cardiac disease. However, the clinical significance of diastolic dysfunction (DDF) in cirrhotic patients has not been clarified. Methods We studied 84 cirrhotic patients with normal systolic function to evaluate the prevalence of DDF using tissue Doppler imaging, and to investigate the possible correlation of DDF with outcomes (hospitalization, death) and with the specific causes of death. Results The mean follow-up was 10 ± 8 months. DDF was diagnosed in 22 patients (26.2%). Patients with DDF more frequently had ascites (90.9% vs. 64.5 %; p = 0.026), lower levels of albumin (OR: 5.39; p = 0.004), higher NT-proBNP levels, and longer QTc interval (464 ± 23 ms vs. 452 ± 30 ms; p = 0.039). At follow-up, patients with DDF did not have a higher incidence of adverse events in terms of hospitalization and death. Conclusions The presence of diastolic dysfunction has not been found to be clearly associated with outcome, and prognosis has been determined primarily by the severity of liver disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)830-834
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • Cirrhosis
  • Diastolic dysfunction
  • Tissue Doppler imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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