Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population

Carlotta Malagoli, Marcella Malavolti, Claudia Agnoli, Catherine M. Crespi, Chiara Fiorentini, Francesca Farnetani, Caterina Longo, Cinzia Ricci, Giuseppe Albertini, Anna Lanzoni, Leonardo Veneziano, Annarosa Virgili, Calogero Pagliarello, Marcello Santini, Pier Alessandro Fanti, Emi Dika, Sabina Sieri, Vittorio Krogh, Giovanni Pellacani, Marco Vinceti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Some results from laboratory and epidemiologic studies suggest that diet may influence the risk of melanoma, but convincing evidence for a role of single nutrients or food items is lacking. Diet quality, which considers the combined effect of multiple food items, may be superior for examining this relation. Objective: We sought to assess whether diet quality, evaluated with the use of 4 different dietary indexes, is associated with melanoma risk. Methods: In this population-based case-control study, we analyzed the relation between 4 diet quality indexes, the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) index, Greek Mediterranean Index (GMI), and Italian Mediterranean Index (IMI), and melanoma risk in a northern Italian community, with the use of data from 380 cases and 719 matched controls who completed a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Results: In the overall sample, we found an inverse association between disease risk and the HEI-2010 and DASH index, but not the Mediterranean indexes, adjusting for potential confounders (skin phototype, body mass index, energy intake, sunburn history, skin sun reaction, and education). However, in sex stratified analyses, the association appeared only in women (P-trend: 0.10 and 0.04 for the HEI-2010 and DASH index, respectively). The inverse relations were stronger in women younger than age 50 y than in older women, for whom the GMI and IMI scores also showed an inverse association with disease risk (P-trend: 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). Conclusions: These results suggest that diet quality may play a role in cutaneous melanoma etiology among women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1800-1807
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume145
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Melanoma
Diet
Food
Population
Hypertension
Skin
Sunburn
Solar System
Energy Intake
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Body Mass Index
Education
Healthy Diet

Keywords

  • Case-control study
  • Diet
  • Diet quality
  • Dietary patterns
  • Epidemiology
  • Melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Malagoli, C., Malavolti, M., Agnoli, C., Crespi, C. M., Fiorentini, C., Farnetani, F., ... Vinceti, M. (2015). Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population. Journal of Nutrition, 145(8), 1800-1807. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.209320

Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population. / Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Agnoli, Claudia; Crespi, Catherine M.; Fiorentini, Chiara; Farnetani, Francesca; Longo, Caterina; Ricci, Cinzia; Albertini, Giuseppe; Lanzoni, Anna; Veneziano, Leonardo; Virgili, Annarosa; Pagliarello, Calogero; Santini, Marcello; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Dika, Emi; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Pellacani, Giovanni; Vinceti, Marco.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 145, No. 8, 2015, p. 1800-1807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malagoli, C, Malavolti, M, Agnoli, C, Crespi, CM, Fiorentini, C, Farnetani, F, Longo, C, Ricci, C, Albertini, G, Lanzoni, A, Veneziano, L, Virgili, A, Pagliarello, C, Santini, M, Fanti, PA, Dika, E, Sieri, S, Krogh, V, Pellacani, G & Vinceti, M 2015, 'Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 8, pp. 1800-1807. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.209320
Malagoli C, Malavolti M, Agnoli C, Crespi CM, Fiorentini C, Farnetani F et al. Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population. Journal of Nutrition. 2015;145(8):1800-1807. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.209320
Malagoli, Carlotta ; Malavolti, Marcella ; Agnoli, Claudia ; Crespi, Catherine M. ; Fiorentini, Chiara ; Farnetani, Francesca ; Longo, Caterina ; Ricci, Cinzia ; Albertini, Giuseppe ; Lanzoni, Anna ; Veneziano, Leonardo ; Virgili, Annarosa ; Pagliarello, Calogero ; Santini, Marcello ; Fanti, Pier Alessandro ; Dika, Emi ; Sieri, Sabina ; Krogh, Vittorio ; Pellacani, Giovanni ; Vinceti, Marco. / Diet quality and risk of melanoma in an Italian population. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 145, No. 8. pp. 1800-1807.
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AU - Malavolti, Marcella

AU - Agnoli, Claudia

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AU - Fiorentini, Chiara

AU - Farnetani, Francesca

AU - Longo, Caterina

AU - Ricci, Cinzia

AU - Albertini, Giuseppe

AU - Lanzoni, Anna

AU - Veneziano, Leonardo

AU - Virgili, Annarosa

AU - Pagliarello, Calogero

AU - Santini, Marcello

AU - Fanti, Pier Alessandro

AU - Dika, Emi

AU - Sieri, Sabina

AU - Krogh, Vittorio

AU - Pellacani, Giovanni

AU - Vinceti, Marco

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