Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study

Carlos A. González, Noemie Travier, Leila Luján-Barroso, Xavier Castellsagué, F. Xavier Bosch, Esther Roura, H. Bas Bueno-De-Mesquita, Domenico Palli, Heiner Boeing, Valeria Pala, Carlotta Sacerdote, Rosario Tumino, Salvatore Panico, Jonas Manjer, Joakim Dillner, Göran Hallmans, Lennart Kjellberg, María José Sanchez, Jone M. Altzibar, Aurelio BarricarteCarmen Navarro, Laudina Rodriguez, Naomi Allen, Timothy J. Key, Rudolf Kaaks, Sabine Rohrmann, Kim Overvad, Anja Olsen, Anne Tjønneland, Christian Munk, Susanne Krüger Kjaer, Petra H M Peeters, Fränzel J B Van Duijnhoven, Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Marie Christine Boutron-Ruault, Antonia Trichopoulou, Vasiliki Benetou, Androniki Naska, Eiliv Lund, Dagrun Engeset, Guri Skeie, Silvia Franceschi, Nadia Slimani, Sabina Rinaldi, Elio Riboli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Some dietary factors could be involved as cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis, but evidence is inconclusive. There are no data about the effect of fruits and vegetables intake (F&V) on cervical cancer from cohort studies. We examined the association between the intake of F&V and selected nutrients and the incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive squamous cervical cancer (ISC) in a prospective study of 299,649 women, participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A calibration study was used to control measurement errors in the dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 9 years of follow-up, 253 ISC and 817 CIS cases were diagnosed. In the calibrated model, we observed a statistically significant inverse association of ISC with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total fruits (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.98) and a statistically nonsignificant inverse association with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total vegetables (HR 0.85: 95% CI 0.65-1.10). Statistically nonsignificant inverse associations were also observed for leafy vegetables, root vegetables, garlic and onions, citrus fruits, vitamin C, vitamin E and retinol for ISC. No association was found regarding beta-carotene, vitamin D and folic acid for ISC. None of the dietary factors examined was associated with CIS. Our study suggests a possible protective role of fruit intake and other dietary factors on ISC that need to be confirmed on a larger number of ISC cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-459
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2011

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Cohort study
  • Foods and nutrients intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

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