Dietary nanoparticles interact with gluten peptides and alter the intestinal homeostasis increasing the risk of celiac disease

Clara Mancuso, Francesca Re, Ilaria Rivolta, Luca Elli, Elisa Gnodi, Jean François Beaulieu, Donatella Barisani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The introduction of metallic nanoparticles (mNPs) into the diet is a matter of concern for human health. In particular, their effect on the gastrointestinal tract may potentially lead to the increased passage of gluten peptides and the activation of the immune response. In consequence, dietary mNPs could play a role in the increasing worldwide celiac disease (CeD) incidence. We evaluated the potential synergistic effects that peptic-tryptic-digested gliadin (PT) and the most-used food mNPs may induce on the intestinal mucosa. PT interaction with mNPs and their consequent aggregation was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses and UV–Vis spectra. In vitro experiments on Caco-2 cells proved the synergistic cytotoxic effect of PT and mNPs, as well as alterations in the monolayer integrity and tight junction proteins. Exposure of duodenal biopsies to gliadin plus mNPs triggered cytokine production, but only in CeD biopsies. These results suggest that mNPs used in the food sector may alter intestinal homeostasis, thus representing an additional environmental risk factor for the development of CeD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6102
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2021

Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Food additives
  • Metallic nanoparticles
  • Nanotoxicity
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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