Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer

F. Bravi, V. Edefonti, G. Randi, W. Garavello, C. La vecchia, M. Ferraroni, R. Talamini, S. Franceschi, A. Decarli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The role of dietary habits on esophageal cancer risk has been rarely considered in terms of dietary patterns. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study, including 304 cases with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and 743 hospital controls. Dietary habits were evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. A posteriori dietary patterns were identified through principal component factor analysis performed on 28 selected nutrients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from multiple logistic regression models applied on quartiles of factor scores, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: We identified five major dietary patterns, named 'animal products and related components', 'vitamins and fiber', 'starch-rich', 'other polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D', and 'other fats'. The 'animal products and related components' pattern was positively related to esophageal cancer (OR = 1.64, 95% CI:1.06-2.55, for the highest versus the lowest quartile of factor scores category). The 'vitamins and fiber' (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.32-0.78) and the 'other polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D' (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.31-0.74) were inversely related to esophageal cancer. No significant association was observed for the other patterns. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a diet rich in foods from animal origin and poor in foods containing vitamins and fiber increase esophageal cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)765-770
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Esophageal Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Vitamins
Confidence Intervals
Food
Feeding Behavior
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Vitamin D
Logistic Models
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Principal Component Analysis
Starch
Esophagus
Statistical Factor Analysis
Case-Control Studies
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Fats
Diet

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Dietary patterns
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Factor analysis
  • Nutrients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Bravi, F., Edefonti, V., Randi, G., Garavello, W., La vecchia, C., Ferraroni, M., ... Decarli, A. (2012). Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer. Annals of Oncology, 23(3), 765-770. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdr295

Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer. / Bravi, F.; Edefonti, V.; Randi, G.; Garavello, W.; La vecchia, C.; Ferraroni, M.; Talamini, R.; Franceschi, S.; Decarli, A.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 23, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 765-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bravi, F, Edefonti, V, Randi, G, Garavello, W, La vecchia, C, Ferraroni, M, Talamini, R, Franceschi, S & Decarli, A 2012, 'Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer', Annals of Oncology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 765-770. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdr295
Bravi F, Edefonti V, Randi G, Garavello W, La vecchia C, Ferraroni M et al. Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer. Annals of Oncology. 2012 Mar;23(3):765-770. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdr295
Bravi, F. ; Edefonti, V. ; Randi, G. ; Garavello, W. ; La vecchia, C. ; Ferraroni, M. ; Talamini, R. ; Franceschi, S. ; Decarli, A. / Dietary patterns and the risk of esophageal cancer. In: Annals of Oncology. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 765-770.
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