Difference between clinic and daytime blood pressure is not a measure of the white coat effect

Gianfranco Parati, Luisa Ulian, Cinzia Santucciu, Stefano Omboni, Giuseppe Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether the difference between blood pressure measured in the clinic or physician's office and the average daytime blood pressure accurately reflects the blood pressure response of the patient to the physician ('white coat effect' or 'white coat hypertension'). We studied 28 hypertensive outpatients (mean age, 41.8±11.2 years; age range, 21 to 64 years) of 35 consecutive patients attending our hypertension clinic, in whom (1) continuous noninvasive finger blood pressure was recorded before and during the visit, (2) blood pressure was measured according to the Riva-Rocci-Korotkoff method (mercury sphygmomanometer) with the patient in the supine position, and (3) daytime ambulatory blood pressure was monitored with a SpaceLabs 90207 device. The peak blood pressure increase recorded directly during the visit was compared with the difference between clinic and daytime average ambulatory blood pressures. Compared with previsit values, peak increases in finger systolic and diastolic blood pressures during the visit to the clinic were 38.2±3.1 and 20.7±1.6 mm Hg, respectively (mean±SEM, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1189
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension
Volume31
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Blood Pressure
Fingers
White Coat Hypertension
Sphygmomanometers
Physicians' Offices
Supine Position
Ambulatory Care
Mercury
Outpatients
Hypertension
Physicians
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Blood pressure monitoring, ambulatory
  • Hypertension, white coat
  • Risk factors
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Parati, G., Ulian, L., Santucciu, C., Omboni, S., & Mancia, G. (1998). Difference between clinic and daytime blood pressure is not a measure of the white coat effect. Hypertension, 31(5), 1185-1189.

Difference between clinic and daytime blood pressure is not a measure of the white coat effect. / Parati, Gianfranco; Ulian, Luisa; Santucciu, Cinzia; Omboni, Stefano; Mancia, Giuseppe.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 31, No. 5, 1998, p. 1185-1189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parati, G, Ulian, L, Santucciu, C, Omboni, S & Mancia, G 1998, 'Difference between clinic and daytime blood pressure is not a measure of the white coat effect', Hypertension, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 1185-1189.
Parati, Gianfranco ; Ulian, Luisa ; Santucciu, Cinzia ; Omboni, Stefano ; Mancia, Giuseppe. / Difference between clinic and daytime blood pressure is not a measure of the white coat effect. In: Hypertension. 1998 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 1185-1189.
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