Differences between in vivo and in vitro activation of cancer patient lymphocytes by recombinant interleukin 2: Possible role for lymphokine-activated killer cell infusion in the in vivo-induced activation

C. Gambacorti-Passerini, L. Rivoltini, M. Radrizzani, F. Belli, G. Sciorelli, F. Ravagnani, A. R. Galazka, N. Cascinelli, G. Parmiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study 15 consecutive melanoma patients were treated with two courses of bolus recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL2) and rIL2 plus in vitro-generated lymphokine-activated killers (LAK), respectively. The immunological monitoring performed after 4 days of rIL2 or rIL2 plus LAK, indicate that the in vivo peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL), activation spontaneous proliferation, tumor cytotoxicity, number of DR+ PBL, obtained after the second cycle of rIL2 plus LAK is significantly higher than after the first cycle of rIL2 alone. During the 5-day interval between the two courses, PBL activation returns to baseline levels and no evidence for increased sensitivity of PBL to rIL2 is present. To further confirm this, two additional patients were studied, in whom rIL2 was administered by continuous i.v. infusion. In these two patients the in vitro versus in vivo PBL activation could be directly and simultaneously compared by using in vitro the same concentration of rIL2 reached and maintained in the patients' sera. The PBL activation induced in vivo by a cycle of rIL2 alone was significantly less (about 10 times) than that obtained in vitro with a comparable rIL2 concentration. Thus, the infusion of in vitro highly activated PBL could explain the increased in vivo lymphocyte activation of the second cycle of rIL2 plus LAK over the first cycle of rIL2 alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5230-5234
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Research
Volume49
Issue number18
Publication statusPublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differences between in vivo and in vitro activation of cancer patient lymphocytes by recombinant interleukin 2: Possible role for lymphokine-activated killer cell infusion in the in vivo-induced activation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this