Difficulties and practices regarding information provision among Korean and Italian nurses.

Francesca Ingravallo, K. H. Kim, Y. H. Han, A. Volta, Paolo Chiari, Patrizia Taddia, Jun Suk Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIM:
To investigate nurses' opinions and practices of providing information in a global context through cultural comparison.
BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION:
Providing sufficient information to patients about nursing interventions and plans is essential for patient-centred care. While many countries have specific legislation making information delivery to patients a legal duty of nurses, no such legislation exists in both the Republic of Korea and Italy; nurses' only guidance is the deontological code.
METHODS:
This was a cross-sectional survey study involving a convenience sample of 174 Korean nurses and 121 Italian nurses working in internal medicine and surgery at university hospitals. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire between February and November 2014. The questionnaire assessed demographic and professional characteristics, and difficulties and practices regarding information provision.
RESULTS:
Korean and Italian nurses significantly differed in all demographic and professional characteristics. More Korean than Italian participants reported that their role in providing information was well explained within their teams, but both groups reported the same level and type of difficulties in delivering information. Nurses in both countries regularly informed patients about medications and nursing procedures, but provided information about nursing care plans less frequently. Few nurses frequently provided information to relatives instead of patients.
CONCLUSIONS:
Despite cultural, demographic and professional differences between Korean and Italian nurses, their difficulties and practices in information delivery to patient were similar.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY:
Hospital managers and policymakers should be aware that nurse-patient communication can be impaired by organizational factors, patient characteristics or the interaction among providers. Educational interventions and strategies are needed to increase information provision to patients about nursing care plans.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)528-535
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Nursing Review
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 29 2017

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Nurses
Patient Care Planning
Nursing
Demography
Legislation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Patient-Centered Care
Republic of Korea
Internal Medicine
Health Policy
Italy
Communication

Keywords

  • Care Plan
  • Cultural Diversity
  • Ethics
  • Health Information
  • Italy
  • Korea
  • Nurse
  • Nursing
  • Patient Autonomy

Cite this

Difficulties and practices regarding information provision among Korean and Italian nurses. / Ingravallo, Francesca; Kim, K. H.; Han, Y. H.; Volta, A.; Chiari, Paolo; Taddia, Patrizia; Kim, Jun Suk.

In: International Nursing Review, Vol. 64, No. 4, 29.05.2017, p. 528-535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ingravallo, Francesca ; Kim, K. H. ; Han, Y. H. ; Volta, A. ; Chiari, Paolo ; Taddia, Patrizia ; Kim, Jun Suk. / Difficulties and practices regarding information provision among Korean and Italian nurses. In: International Nursing Review. 2017 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 528-535.
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