Direct evidence for wake-related increases and sleep-related decreases in synaptic strength in rodent cortex

Zhong Wu Liu, Ugo Faraguna, Chiara Cirelli, Giulio Tononi, Xiao Bing Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite evidence that waking is associated with net synaptic potentiation and sleep with depression, direct proof for changes in synaptic currents is lacking in large brain areas such as the cerebral cortex. By recording miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) from frontal cortex slices of mice and rats that had been awake or asleep, we found that the frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs increased after waking and decreased after sleep, independent of time of day. Recovery sleep after deprivation also decreased mEPSCs, suggesting that sleep favors synaptic homeostasis. Since stronger synapses require more energy, space, and supplies, a generalized renormalization of synapses may be an important function of sleep.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8671-8675
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume30
Issue number25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 23 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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