Direct mapping of the solid-liquid adhesion energy with subnanometre resolution

Kislon Voïtchovsky, Jeffrey J. Kuna, Sonia Antoranz Contera, Erio Tosatti, Francesco Stellacci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Solid-liquid interfaces play a fundamental role in surface electrochemistry, catalysis, wetting, self-assembly and biomolecular functions. The interfacial energy determines many of the properties of such interfaces, including the arrangement of the liquid molecules at the surface of the solid. Diffraction techniques are often used to investigate the structure of solid-liquid interfaces, but measurements of irregular or inhomogeneous interfaces remain challenging. Here, we report atomic-and molecular-resolution images of various organic and inorganic samples in liquids, obtained with a commercial atomic force microscope operated dynamically with small-amplitude modulation. This approach uses the structured liquid layers close to the solid to enhance lateral resolution. We propose a model to explain the mechanism dominating the image formation, and show that the energy dissipated during this process is related to the interfacial energy through a readily achievable calibration curve. Our topographic images and interfacial energy maps could provide insights into important interfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-405
Number of pages5
JournalNature Nanotechnology
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

interfacial energy
adhesion
Adhesion
liquid-solid interfaces
Interfacial energy
Liquids
liquids
image resolution
electrochemistry
wetting
catalysis
energy
self assembly
microscopes
Amplitude modulation
Electrochemistry
Image resolution
Self assembly
Catalysis
curves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Voïtchovsky, K., Kuna, J. J., Contera, S. A., Tosatti, E., & Stellacci, F. (2010). Direct mapping of the solid-liquid adhesion energy with subnanometre resolution. Nature Nanotechnology, 5(6), 401-405. https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2010.67

Direct mapping of the solid-liquid adhesion energy with subnanometre resolution. / Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Kuna, Jeffrey J.; Contera, Sonia Antoranz; Tosatti, Erio; Stellacci, Francesco.

In: Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 5, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 401-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Voïtchovsky, K, Kuna, JJ, Contera, SA, Tosatti, E & Stellacci, F 2010, 'Direct mapping of the solid-liquid adhesion energy with subnanometre resolution', Nature Nanotechnology, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 401-405. https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2010.67
Voïtchovsky, Kislon ; Kuna, Jeffrey J. ; Contera, Sonia Antoranz ; Tosatti, Erio ; Stellacci, Francesco. / Direct mapping of the solid-liquid adhesion energy with subnanometre resolution. In: Nature Nanotechnology. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 401-405.
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