Disruption of the Ang II type 1 receptor promotes longevity in mice

Ariela Benigni, Daniela Corna, Carla Zoja, Aurelio Sonzogni, Roberto Latini, Monica Salio, Sara Conti, Daniela Rottoli, Lorena Longaretti, Paola Cassis, Marina Morigi, Thomas M. Coffman, Giuseppe Remuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The renin-angiotensin system plays a role in the etiology of hypertension and the pathophysiology of cardiac and renal diseases in humans. Ang II is the central product of this system and is involved in regulating immune responses, inflammation, cell growth, and proliferation by acting through Ang II type 1 receptors (AT1 and AT2). Here, we show that targeted disruption of the Agtr1a gene that encodes AT1A results in marked prolongation of life span in mice. Agtr1a-/- mice developed less cardiac and vascular injury, and multiple organs from these mice displayed less oxidative damage than wild-type mice. The longevity phenotype was associated with an increased number of mitochondria and upregulation of the prosurvival genes nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) and sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) in the kidney. In cultured tubular epithelial cells, Ang II downregulated Sirt3 mRNA, and this effect was inhibited by an AT1 antagonist. These results demonstrate that disruption of AT1 promotes longevity in mice, possibly through the attenuation of oxidative stress and overexpression of prosurvival genes, and suggests that the Ang II/AT1 pathway may be targeted to influence life span in mammals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-530
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume119
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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