Dissecting the mechanisms and molecules underlying the potential carcinogenicity of red and processed meat in colorectal cancer (CRC): An overview on the current state of knowledge

Marco Cascella, Sabrina Bimonte, Antonio Barbieri, Vitale Del Vecchio, Domenico Caliendo, Vincenzo Schiavone, Roberta Fusco, Vincenza Granata, Claudio Arra, Arturo Cuomo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Meat is a crucial nutrient for human health since it represents a giant supply of proteins, minerals, and vitamins. On the opposite hand, the intake of red and processed meat is taken into account dangerous due to its potential of carcinogenesis and cancer risk improvement, particularly for colorectal cancer (CRC), although it has been reported that also the contaminations of beef infected by oncogenic bovine viruses could increase colorectal cancer's risk. Regarding the mechanisms underlying the potential carcinogenicity of red and processed meat, different hypotheses have been proposed. A suggested mechanism describes the potential role of the heterocyclic amines (HACs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAs) in carcinogenesis induced by DNA mutation. Another hypothesis states that heme, through the lipid peroxidation process and therefore the formation of N-nitroso compounds (NOCs), produces cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes, resulting in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, a recent proposed hypothesis, is based on the combined actions between the N-Glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and genotoxic compounds. The purpose of this narrative review is to shed a light on the mechanisms underlying the potential carcinogenicity of red and processed meat, by summarizing the data reported in literature on this topic.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalInfectious Agents and Cancer
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2018

Keywords

  • Carcinogenesis
  • Heme
  • Heterocyclic amines
  • Neu5Gc
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
  • Processed meat
  • Red meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dissecting the mechanisms and molecules underlying the potential carcinogenicity of red and processed meat in colorectal cancer (CRC): An overview on the current state of knowledge'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this