Dissociating explicit and implicit timing in Parkinson’s disease patients: Evidence from bisection and foreperiod tasks

Giovanna Mioni, Mariagrazia Capizzi, Antonino Vallesi, Ángel Correa, Raffaella Di Giacopo, Franca Stablum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A consistent body of literature reported that Parkinson’s disease (PD) is marked by severe deficits in temporal processing. However, the exact nature of timing problems in PD patients is still elusive. In particular, what remains unclear is whether the temporal dysfunction observed in PD patients regards explicit and/or implicit timing. Explicit timing tasks require participants to attend to the duration of the stimulus, whereas in implicit timing tasks no explicit instruction to process time is received but time still affects performance. In the present study, we investigated temporal ability in PD by comparing 20 PD participants and 20 control participants in both explicit and implicit timing tasks. Specifically, we used a time bisection task to investigate explicit timing and a foreperiod task for implicit timing. Moreover, this is the first study investigating sequential effects in PD participants. Results showed preserved temporal ability in PD participants in the implicit timing task only (i.e., normal foreperiod and sequential effects). By contrast, PD participants failed in the explicit timing task as they displayed shorter perceived durations and higher variability compared to controls. Overall, the dissociation reported here supports the idea that timing can be differentiated according to whether it is explicitly or implicitly processed, and that PD participants are selectively impaired in the explicit processing of time.

Original languageEnglish
Article number17
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 6 2018

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Parkinson Disease

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Explicit timing
  • Foreperiod
  • Implicit timing
  • Parkinson participants
  • Sequential effects
  • Time bisection task

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Dissociating explicit and implicit timing in Parkinson’s disease patients : Evidence from bisection and foreperiod tasks. / Mioni, Giovanna; Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Vallesi, Antonino; Correa, Ángel; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Stablum, Franca.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 12, 17, 06.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mioni, Giovanna ; Capizzi, Mariagrazia ; Vallesi, Antonino ; Correa, Ángel ; Di Giacopo, Raffaella ; Stablum, Franca. / Dissociating explicit and implicit timing in Parkinson’s disease patients : Evidence from bisection and foreperiod tasks. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2018 ; Vol. 12.
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