DNA immunization followed by a single boost with cells: A protein-free immunization protocol for production of monoclonal antibodies against the native form of membrane proteins

Satoshi Nagata, Giuliana Salvatore, Ira Pastan

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31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advancements in antibody-based therapies require the development of an efficient method for generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native form of membrane proteins. We examined DNA immunization followed by a single boost with cells as a protein-free immunization protocol for production of MAbs. Mice immunized with plasmid cDNAs encoding human CD30 or Ret tyrosine kinase were given a single boost with cells expressing the corresponding antigen prior to cell fusion. A total of nine cell fusion experiments revealed that the cell boost is necessary for efficient generation of hybridomas and the DNA-cell boost method gave good yields of specific MAbs (5-59 MAbs from one mouse). All IgG isotypes except IgG3 were generated, although IgG2a was the dominant isotype. All the MAbs reacted with native antigens expressed on cells in a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis as well as with recombinant CD30 or Ret protein genetically fused with human Fc in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The affinities of the anti-CD30 MAbs to CD30-Fc protein ranged from 0.9 to 12.4 nM Kds, which were comparable to existing MAbs to these proteins, which range from 3.0 to 13.0 nM. Western blot analysis and topographical epitope mapping experiments based on the mutual competition of pairs of the anti-CD30 MAbs revealed that about 40% of the epitopes were linear epitopes and that each epitope was topographically classified into one of six groups. The large number of MAbs that react with high affinities to a variety of epitopes on the native form of antigens indicates that the method presented in this paper could be generally useful for generating MAbs to other membrane proteins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-72
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Immunological Methods
Volume280
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2003

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Immunization
Membrane Proteins
Monoclonal Antibodies
DNA
Proteins
Epitopes
Cell Fusion
Antigens
Immunoglobulin G
Epitope Mapping
Hybridomas
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Plasmids
Complementary DNA
Fluorescence
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Antibodies

Keywords

  • CD30
  • DNA immunization
  • Hybridoma
  • Immunotherapy
  • Monoclonal antibody
  • Ret

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "Recent advancements in antibody-based therapies require the development of an efficient method for generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native form of membrane proteins. We examined DNA immunization followed by a single boost with cells as a protein-free immunization protocol for production of MAbs. Mice immunized with plasmid cDNAs encoding human CD30 or Ret tyrosine kinase were given a single boost with cells expressing the corresponding antigen prior to cell fusion. A total of nine cell fusion experiments revealed that the cell boost is necessary for efficient generation of hybridomas and the DNA-cell boost method gave good yields of specific MAbs (5-59 MAbs from one mouse). All IgG isotypes except IgG3 were generated, although IgG2a was the dominant isotype. All the MAbs reacted with native antigens expressed on cells in a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis as well as with recombinant CD30 or Ret protein genetically fused with human Fc in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The affinities of the anti-CD30 MAbs to CD30-Fc protein ranged from 0.9 to 12.4 nM Kds, which were comparable to existing MAbs to these proteins, which range from 3.0 to 13.0 nM. Western blot analysis and topographical epitope mapping experiments based on the mutual competition of pairs of the anti-CD30 MAbs revealed that about 40{\%} of the epitopes were linear epitopes and that each epitope was topographically classified into one of six groups. The large number of MAbs that react with high affinities to a variety of epitopes on the native form of antigens indicates that the method presented in this paper could be generally useful for generating MAbs to other membrane proteins.",
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N2 - Recent advancements in antibody-based therapies require the development of an efficient method for generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native form of membrane proteins. We examined DNA immunization followed by a single boost with cells as a protein-free immunization protocol for production of MAbs. Mice immunized with plasmid cDNAs encoding human CD30 or Ret tyrosine kinase were given a single boost with cells expressing the corresponding antigen prior to cell fusion. A total of nine cell fusion experiments revealed that the cell boost is necessary for efficient generation of hybridomas and the DNA-cell boost method gave good yields of specific MAbs (5-59 MAbs from one mouse). All IgG isotypes except IgG3 were generated, although IgG2a was the dominant isotype. All the MAbs reacted with native antigens expressed on cells in a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis as well as with recombinant CD30 or Ret protein genetically fused with human Fc in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The affinities of the anti-CD30 MAbs to CD30-Fc protein ranged from 0.9 to 12.4 nM Kds, which were comparable to existing MAbs to these proteins, which range from 3.0 to 13.0 nM. Western blot analysis and topographical epitope mapping experiments based on the mutual competition of pairs of the anti-CD30 MAbs revealed that about 40% of the epitopes were linear epitopes and that each epitope was topographically classified into one of six groups. The large number of MAbs that react with high affinities to a variety of epitopes on the native form of antigens indicates that the method presented in this paper could be generally useful for generating MAbs to other membrane proteins.

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